Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am reading the book called "Effective Java" by Joshua Bloch and there is a piece of code which leads to memory leaks.

public class Stack {
 private Object[] elements;
 private int size = 0;
 private static final int DEFAULT_INITIAL_CAPACITY = 16;

public Stack() {
    elements = new Object[DEFAULT_INITIAL_CAPACITY];
}

public void push(Object e) {
    ensureCapacity();
    elements[size++] = e;
}

public Object pop() {
    if (size == 0)
        throw new EmptyStackException();
    return elements[--size];
}

/**
 * Ensure space for at least one more element, roughly
 * doubling the capacity each time the array needs to grow.
 */
private void ensureCapacity() {
    if (elements.length == size)
        elements = Arrays.copyOf(elements, 2 * size + 1);
}

}

The pop method should be replaced with

public Object pop() {
    if (size == 0)
        throw new EmptyStackException();
    Object result = elements[--size];
    elements[size] = null; // Eliminate obsolete reference
    return result;
} 

It's clear to me. Can the code (see below) lead to memory leaks? E.g., I rotate the screen a lot of times and private ArrayList<String> mArrayList = new ArrayList<String>(CAPASITY); allocates memory each time.

public class MainActivity extends Activity implements OnClickListener {

    private static final int CAPASITY = 10000;
    private ArrayList<String> mArrayList = new ArrayList<String>(CAPASITY);

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);
        // Some work on mArrayList
    }

    @Override
    public void onClick(View v) {
        // Some work on mArrayList
    }

    @Override
    protected void onDestroy() {
        super.onDestroy();
        // TODO: mArrayList = null to prevent memory leaks. Is it necessary to do it?
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
in which way does it leak? – Blackbelt Jun 4 '13 at 7:53
    
@blackbelt, I edited the question. E.g., memory is allocated after each screen rotation. – Maksim Dmitriev Jun 4 '13 at 7:56
1  
@RedPlanet, there's no memory leaks, mArrayList will contain references for new ArrayList, and there will be no references to old one, so it will be garbage collected. Sorry for offtopic, did you read the second edition? Where did you get it in Moscow and what cost it had? – SpongeBobFan Jun 4 '13 at 8:40
    
@SpongeBobFan, I've been reading for a couple of weeks. Are there any better editions? I don't remember where I bought it. – Maksim Dmitriev Jun 4 '13 at 8:47
    
@RedPlanet, there's 1st edition translated to Russian, and 2nd edition that isn't. 2nd edition is much more up-to-date (2008 vs 2001), but i saw it only in 1 internet shop for $200 with 21 days for delivery. – SpongeBobFan Jun 4 '13 at 9:02
up vote 3 down vote accepted

// TODO: mArrayList = null to prevent memory leaks. Is it necessary to do it?

No, the activity object and its members such as mArrayList can be garbage collected. Your activity code does not show anything that would hold object references unnecessarily long.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.