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In my AngularJS application, I would like to make some kind of directive that inserts multiple HTML elements to an HTML element.

Basically, I want Angular to build this result:

<div class="maindiv">
    <!-- Below are some divs common to all "maindiv" -->
    <div> ..XXX.. </div>
    <div> ..YYY.. </div>

    <!-- Below are some elements specific to maindiv1 -->
    <div> ..ABCD.. </div>
    <div> ..EFGH.. </div>
    <div> ..IJKL.. </div>
</div>

<div class="maindiv">
    <!-- Below are some divs common to all "maindiv" -->
    <div> ..XXX.. </div>
    <div> ..YYY.. </div>

    <!-- Below are some elements specific to this particular maindiv -->
    <div> ..1235.. </div>
    <div> ..5678.. </div>
</div>

... from HTML that looks like this :

<div class="maindiv" generate-common-stuff>
    <!-- Below are some elements specific to maindiv1 -->
    <div> ..ABCD.. </div>
    <div> ..EFGH.. </div>
    <div> ..IJKL.. </div>
</div>

<div class="maindiv" generate-common-stuff>
    <!-- Below are some elements specific to this particular maindiv -->
    <div> ..1235.. </div>
    <div> ..5678.. </div>
</div>

... or like this:

<div class="maindiv">
    <generate-common-stuff></generate-common-stuff>

    <!-- Below are some elements specific to maindiv1 -->   
    ...

When I tried to make my own directive, Angular complained about having multiple root elements in my template.

Note that because of incompatibilities with other libraries (JQueryMobile), I cannot regroup <div> ..XXX.. </div><div> ..YYY.. </div> under a div and use it in the template. They must be inserted just under the maindiv

Do you have any idea on how to implement that ?

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1 Answer 1

Try write a directive called generate-stuff and pass common and specific stuff as attributes, binded from the scope.

<generate-stuff common="commonStuffInScope" specific="specificStuffInScope"></generate-stuff>

...and in your directive

myModule.directive('', function() {
  return {
    ...
    scope: {
      common: "=common",
      specific: "=specific"
    }
    ...
  };
});

so in the link function you have a bidirectional binding either to the common and the specific variables on the scope.

Releated documentation fragment: http://docs.angularjs.org/guide/directive#directivedefinitionobject

share|improve this answer
    
In my mind, common and specific stuff are not scope variables, but are whole html templates -- that may contain {{ }} references to scope variables. In my application, each maindiv is in a different .html file, and ideally, I wanted the common stuff to be in a .js or .html file. –  Matthieu Rouget Jun 4 '13 at 11:36
    
Then you access the common and specific through $attrs in the linking function and load the resources via the $http service. You can use $templateCache to store the common stuff. Then compile the dom and make references to $scope with $compile. –  Olivér Kovács Jun 4 '13 at 11:47

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