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I started off with this code, which did not compile:

Object[] obj= new Object[2];
obj[0]=new Object () { public String compute() {return "yay 1!";} };
obj[1]=new Object () { public String compute() {return "yay 2!";} };

for (Object o : obj)
    System.out.println(o.compute());

Because Object does not have a compute() method defined for it. So, I assumed that java threw away the function; however, the following did work:

Object[] obj= new Object[2];
obj[0]=new Object () { public String toString() {return "yay 1!";} };
obj[1]=new Object () { public String toString() {return "yay 2!";} };

for (Object o : obj)
    System.out.println(o);

So, java must still have the function definition stored somewhere, right? Or is this because I'm overriding toString()?

My question is how do I tell java that compute() exists?

If it's not possible to do that, could I do something like overriding a method that does exist for Objects, as I did in the first example? The method that compute() actually stands for is a method that takes an int. This may be horrible, but should I override wait(long l)?

Thanks in advance.

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The second works because toString is one of Object's methods... – assylias Jun 4 '13 at 9:43
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Java did not "throw away" the method; the instances you put into that array possess it, but Java's type system has no feature which would make them available to outside code.

You can verify the existence of the methods through reflection, for example.

If you want more methods for your anonymous classes, define an appropriate interface and use new MyInterface() { ... }.

share|improve this answer
    
The method that compute() actually stands in for is a method that takes an int. This may be horrible, but should I override wait(long l) to get this to work? – Steve P. Jun 4 '13 at 9:46
    
There would be no rationale to override wait. – Marko Topolnik Jun 4 '13 at 9:47
1  
@SteveP. If you really need a compute method, why don't you define an interface with that method and implement it as an anonymous local class? – assylias Jun 4 '13 at 9:48
    
Figured as much. So if I define an interface and use new MyInterface() { ... }, it will tell java that the method(s) exist and I can call the method as I wanted to? – Steve P. Jun 4 '13 at 9:48
    
Yes, that's how it works. The array must also be of type MyInterface[]. – Marko Topolnik Jun 4 '13 at 9:49

That's what is called Anonymous class

You defined an Anonymous class

new Object() { public String compute() {return "yay 1!";} }

which you couldn't use afterwards.

If you had declared

class Child { // extends Object {

  public String compute() {return "yay 1!";}

}

then you could have done

for (Object o : obj)
    System.out.println(((Child)o).compute());
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