Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm translating code from perl and I've come accross the following line

$text =~ s/([?!\.][\ ]*[\'\"\)\]\p{IsPf}]+) +([\'\"\(\[\¿\¡\p{IsPi}]*[\ ]*[\p{IsUpper}])/$1\n$2/g;

My question is, what does \p{IsPf} and \p{IsPi} match to? I've tried searching online for it but haven't found anything...

share|improve this question
1  
As an aside: There are lots of unneccessary backslashes in that regex, and two unneccessary captures. s/[?!.][ ]*['")\]\p{IsPf}]+\K +(?=['"([¿¡\p{IsPi}]*[ ]*[\p{IsUpper}])/\n/g should be equivalent for practical purposes. –  amon Jun 4 '13 at 11:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Let's ask RegexBuddy: It's a Unicode character property.

RegexBuddy Screenshot

You can find more documentation on Unicode character properties and Unicode scripts here.

share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks! xD –  Meh Nada Jun 4 '13 at 11:46

\p{..} matches characters by their unicode character properties: http://perldoc.perl.org/perlunicode.html#Unicode-Character-Properties

In particular, \p{IsPf} matches characters with the "final punctuation" property, and \p{IsPi} matches charactes with the "initial punctuation" property. These seem to be mostly closing and opening quotes.

The point of the substitution seems to be breaking sentences into separate lines by matching the end and beginning of a sentence, taking into account that a sentence may start and end with various types of punctuation.

share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks. Both yours and Tim's answers would have been perfect... unfortunately I have to pick one and not both.. –  Meh Nada Jun 4 '13 at 11:45

As a bit of extra information, unichars from Unicode::Tussle can be used to list the matching characters.

$ unichars -au '\p{IsPi}' | cat
 «  U+000AB LEFT-POINTING DOUBLE ANGLE QUOTATION MARK
 ‘  U+02018 LEFT SINGLE QUOTATION MARK
 ‛  U+0201B SINGLE HIGH-REVERSED-9 QUOTATION MARK
 “  U+0201C LEFT DOUBLE QUOTATION MARK
 ‟  U+0201F DOUBLE HIGH-REVERSED-9 QUOTATION MARK
 ‹  U+02039 SINGLE LEFT-POINTING ANGLE QUOTATION MARK
 ⸂  U+02E02 LEFT SUBSTITUTION BRACKET
 ⸄  U+02E04 LEFT DOTTED SUBSTITUTION BRACKET
 ⸉  U+02E09 LEFT TRANSPOSITION BRACKET
 ⸌  U+02E0C LEFT RAISED OMISSION BRACKET
 ⸜  U+02E1C LEFT LOW PARAPHRASE BRACKET
 ⸠  U+02E20 LEFT VERTICAL BAR WITH QUILL

$ unichars -au '\p{IsPf}' | cat
 »  U+000BB RIGHT-POINTING DOUBLE ANGLE QUOTATION MARK
 ’  U+02019 RIGHT SINGLE QUOTATION MARK
 ”  U+0201D RIGHT DOUBLE QUOTATION MARK
 ›  U+0203A SINGLE RIGHT-POINTING ANGLE QUOTATION MARK
 ⸃  U+02E03 RIGHT SUBSTITUTION BRACKET
 ⸅  U+02E05 RIGHT DOTTED SUBSTITUTION BRACKET
 ⸊  U+02E0A RIGHT TRANSPOSITION BRACKET
 ⸍  U+02E0D RIGHT RAISED OMISSION BRACKET
 ⸝  U+02E1D RIGHT LOW PARAPHRASE BRACKET
 ⸡  U+02E21 RIGHT VERTICAL BAR WITH QUILL
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.