Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a file pointed to by a user defined environmental variable $file defined as:

file='filename.groovy'

When I do:

echo $file

It prints correctly without any problem as:

filename.groovy

and when I do:

cat $file

Its successfully printing the content of the file 'filename.groovy'

Everything is perfect till here

But, the problem is :

When I'm trying to redirect the output of sed command as:

sed 's/def version = ".*"/def version = "'$version'"/' $file > $file

and then

cat $file

Its printing nothing i.e., my original file got truncated.

Why is it so ?

Please suggest the reason and solution to redirect the output of sed command to the file 'filename.groovy' by using the variable $file

Thanx in advance . . .

share|improve this question
    
Actually I hit Tab and Enter accidentally, so my question got submitted before I complete and then I got disconnected. Sorry for that... –  sivareddy-cc Jun 4 '13 at 11:48
    
How if we want to redirect that output to a different file pointed to by $file2 ? –  sivareddy-cc Jun 4 '13 at 11:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You cannot read a file and in the meanwhile redirect your output to it.

What you can do is to use -i parameter in sed, that updates the file:

sed -i 's/def version = ".*"/def version = "'$version'"/' $file

You can see an example in http://stackoverflow.com/a/16901328/1983854 I posted yesterday.

share|improve this answer
    
Its working . . Thank you very much for quick reply –  sivareddy-cc Jun 4 '13 at 11:52
    
How if we want to redirect that output to a different file pointed to by $file2 ? –  sivareddy-cc Jun 4 '13 at 11:58
1  
In that case, sed 's...' $file1 > $file2 should make the trick. –  fedorqui Jun 4 '13 at 11:59
    
Okey.. Thank you. I got it. So, that means the problem arises only if the redirection is meant to the same file. Am I right? –  sivareddy-cc Jun 4 '13 at 12:04
    
Exactly. Like what I get here: $ cat a > a cat: a: input file is output file. –  fedorqui Jun 4 '13 at 12:05

> truncates the file before the command is run, but you can use sed -i to replace in a file in-place.

share|improve this answer
    
I got it . . Thank you very much for quick reply –  sivareddy-cc Jun 4 '13 at 11:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.