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I have a WPF application, and I'm using a BackgroundWorker component to retrieve some data from the back-end and display it in the UI.

The BackgroundWorker has WorkerReportsProgress = true so that the UI can be updated periodically. The BackgroundWorker also has WorkerSupportsCancellation = true so that it can be Cancelled by the user. All that works great!

I am having trouble trying to implement a third and more complex behavior. Basically, the user needs to have the flexibility to start a new BackgroundWorker task at any time including while one is currently executing. If a task is currently executing and a new one is started, the old task needs to be marked as Aborted. Aborted tasks are different from Cancelled in that Aborted is not allowed to make any further UI updates. It should be "cancelled silently".

I wrapped the BackgroundWorker inside the AsyncTask class and added the IsAborted bit. Checking against the IsAborted bit inside ProgressChanged and RunWorkerCompleted prevents further UI updates. Great!

However, this approach breaks down because when new tasks are started up, CurrentTask is replaced with a new instance of AsyncTask. As a result, it becomes difficult to track the CurrentTask.

As noted, in the TODO:, it's almost like I want to wait until the CurrentTask completes after an abort before starting a new task. But I know this will provide a bad user experience as the UI thread will be blocked until the old task completes.

Is there a better way to track multiple AsyncTasks ensuring that new ones can be fired up on demand and old ones are Aborted correctly with no further UI updates? There doesn't seem to be a good way to track the CurrentTask... Does that TPL offer a better way to handle what I'm after?

Here are the notable snippets I have inside my Window class:

private AsyncTask CurrentTask { get; set; }

private class AsyncTask
{
   private static int Ids { get; set; }

   public AsyncTask()
   {
      Ids = Ids + 1;

      this.Id = Ids;

      this.BackgroundWorker = new BackgroundWorker();
      this.BackgroundWorker.WorkerReportsProgress = true;
      this.BackgroundWorker.WorkerSupportsCancellation = true;
   }

   public int Id { get; private set; }
   public BackgroundWorker BackgroundWorker { get; private set; }
   public bool IsAborted { get; set; }
}

void StartNewTask()
{
   if (this.CurrentTask != null && this.CurrentTask.BackgroundWorker.IsBusy)
   {
      AbortTask();

      //TODO: should we wait for CurrentTask to finish up? this will block the UI?
   }

   var asyncTask = new AsyncTask();

   asyncTask.BackgroundWorker.DoWork += backgroundWorker_DoWork;
   asyncTask.BackgroundWorker.ProgressChanged += backgroundWorker_ProgressChanged;
   asyncTask.BackgroundWorker.RunWorkerCompleted += backgroundWorker_RunWorkerCompleted;

   AppendText("Starting New Task: " + asyncTask.Id);

   this.CurrentTask = asyncTask;

   asyncTask.BackgroundWorker.RunWorkerAsync();
}

void AbortTask()
{
   if (this.CurrentTask != null && this.CurrentTask.BackgroundWorker.IsBusy)
   {
      AppendText("Aborting Task " + this.CurrentTask.Id + "...");
      this.CurrentTask.IsAborted = true;
      this.CurrentTask.BackgroundWorker.CancelAsync();
   }
}

void CancelTask()
{
   if (this.CurrentTask != null && this.CurrentTask.BackgroundWorker.IsBusy)
   {
      AppendText("Cancelling Task " + this.CurrentTask.Id + "...");
      this.CurrentTask.BackgroundWorker.CancelAsync();
   }
}

void backgroundWorker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
   var backgroundWorker = (BackgroundWorker)sender;

   for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++)
   {
       //check before making call...
       if (backgroundWorker.CancellationPending)
       {
          e.Cancel = true;
          return;
       }

       //simulate a call to remote service...
       Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10.0));

       //check before reporting any progress...
       if (backgroundWorker.CancellationPending)
       {
          e.Cancel = true;
          return;
       }

       backgroundWorker.ReportProgress(0);
    }
 }

 void backgroundWorker_ProgressChanged(object sender, ProgressChangedEventArgs e)
 {
    if (this.CurrentTask.IsAborted)
       return;

    AppendText("[" + DateTime.Now.ToString("MM/dd/yyyy HH:mm:ss") + "] " + "Progress on Task: " + this.CurrentTask.Id + "...");
 }

 void backgroundWorker_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
 {
    if (this.CurrentTask.IsAborted)
      return;

    if (e.Cancelled)
    {
       AppendText("Cancelled Task: " + this.CurrentTask.Id);
    }
    else if (e.Error != null)
    {
       AppendText("Error Task: " + this.CurrentTask.Id);
    }
    else
    {
       AppendText("Completed Task: " + this.CurrentTask.Id);
    }

    //cleanup...
    this.CurrentTask.BackgroundWorker.DoWork -= backgroundWorker_DoWork;
    this.CurrentTask.BackgroundWorker.ProgressChanged -= backgroundWorker_ProgressChanged;
    this.CurrentTask.BackgroundWorker.RunWorkerCompleted -= backgroundWorker_RunWorkerCompleted;
    this.CurrentTask= null;
}
share|improve this question
    
Look like what this boils down to is you want to run a long process but allow the user to kill this long running process mid-way and start a new one. Is this correct ? – TheKingDave Jun 4 '13 at 13:49
    
Yes. But, a task can be killed via Cancel or via Abort. Cancel is called by the user. Here, the thread exits but it is free to finish updating the UI. Abort is called when a second task is created and started if another was currently executing. The original task must be aborted. In this case, the new task has precedence and the old aborted task cannot update the UI and must "exit silently". – John Russell Jun 4 '13 at 13:54
    
So if you "Abort" the task should the system finish the long running process or not ? If I was a user and I selected abort I would it expect the system just stop everything if I selected cancel I would expect it to stop gracefully. – TheKingDave Jun 4 '13 at 14:05
    
Cancel will exit gracefully via BackgroundWorker's cancel mechanism; but when an abort occurs, the client could be in the middle of an async wcf call. It would be difficult to completely interrupt that call and return immediately. I was thinking the easiest way to achieve the user experience, I'm after would be just to let the aborted thread's DoWork finish silently. The result would not be used. – John Russell Jun 4 '13 at 14:25
    
As I said it depends what your WCF call does if it only returns data with modification then you are probably ok. If your WCF call modifies any state (say for example inserts into a database) then you cannot cancel or abort the call unless you can safely undo any that the WCF call did. Say for example your call inserts into the DB 5 rows. You could mark these rows with an insertID or something then if the user hits cancel you silently delete the rows that have the returned insertID that your background worker gets. – TheKingDave Jun 4 '13 at 14:30
up vote 6 down vote accepted

From what I understand, you don't want to actually abort the thread, you just want it to continue working silently (i.e. not update the UI)? One way would be to keep a list of BackgroundWorkers and remove their event handlers if they're to be "aborted".

List<BackgroundWorker> allBGWorkers = new List<BackgroundWorker>();

//user creates a new bg worker.
BackgroundWorker newBGWorker = new BackgroundWorker();
//.... fill out properties


//before adding the new bg worker to the list, iterate through the list 
//and ensure that the event handlers are removed from the existing ones    
foreach(var bg in allBGWorkers)
{    
   bg.ProgressChanged -= backgroundWorker_ProgressChanged;
   bg.RunWorkerCompleted -= backgroundWorker_RunWorkerCompleted;
}

//add the latest bg worker you created
allBGWorkers.Add(newBGWorker);

That way you can keep track of all the workers. Since a List maintains order, you'll know which one the latest on is (the last one in the list) but you can just as easily use a Stack here if you prefer.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the quick reply. Those are exactly the hints I was looking for. Instead of wrapping the BackgroundWorker and checking against IsAborted, simply removing the event handlers is much easier to manage an "aborted" thread. In addition, a Stack is a perfect data structure for always tracking the current, i.e. the Top. Thanks! – John Russell Jun 4 '13 at 14:18
    
You're welcome :) – keyboardP Jun 4 '13 at 14:20

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