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I'm writing some simple c programming code to replace a string of multiple blanks with a single blank. my code is as follows but it obviously contains errors. I'm trying to avoid the use of array or pointers. So any advice on how to correct my mistake?

#include <stdio.h>
int main(void)
{
    int c,d;
    d=0;
    while((c=getchar())!=EOF)
        {
        if (c==' ')
            {
                d=getchar();
                if (d!=' '&&d!=EOF)
                    putchar(c);
            }
        putchar(c);
        }
}
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5 Answers 5

When doing this kind of filtering, it's often a good idea to never repeat the reading of input, since that tends to scatter the logic. At least in my experience, I find it easier if I read input in one place and then deal with it.

For this problem, a simple state machine is enough: just remember if the last character was blank or not, and only output blanks if the last character read was not a blank.

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First: avoid useing getchar, putchar. Use getc, putc instead.

If you badly want to read character by character then something like this would do:

int c, lastc = '\0';
while((c = getc(stdin)) != EOF) {
    if (c == ' ' && lastc == ' ')
        continue;
    putc(c, stdout);
    lastc = c;
}
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Where is it said that getchar and putchar are deprecated? I see no indication of that in 7.21.7.6 or 7.21.7.8 of N1570. –  Daniel Fischer Jun 4 '13 at 14:10
    
Sorry, my mistake, confused them with gets which is indeed deprecated. Removed that part. –  Sergey L. Jun 4 '13 at 14:12
    
I see. gets is not only deprecated, it has been removed, oh joy! –  Daniel Fischer Jun 4 '13 at 14:13
    
lastc may be used uninitialized. And, please, Insert continue; in a new line. –  Jonatan Goebel Jun 4 '13 at 14:19
    
You are right about initialisation. –  Sergey L. Jun 4 '13 at 14:24

Use a flag to remember if you've read a blank or not:

#include <stdio.h>

int main( void )
{
  int lastBlank = 0;
  int c;

  while ( (c = fgetc( stdin )) != EOF )
  {
    if ( c != ' ' || !lastBlank )
      fputc( c, stdout );

    lastBlank = ( c == ' ' );
  }
  return 0;
}
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This code seems to work fine:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    int c, d;
    d = 0;
    while ((c = getchar()) != EOF)
    {
        if (c == ' ')
        {
            while ((d = getchar()) == ' ');
            putchar(c);
            putchar(d);
        } else {
            putchar(c);
        }
    }
}
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#include<stdio.h>

int nextChar(FILE *fp){
    static int buff = 0;
    int ch = fgetc(fp);
    if(buff != ch)
        buff = ch;
    else
        while(buff == ' ')
            buff = fgetc(fp);
    return buff;
}

int main(void){
    FILE *fp = stdin;
    int ch;
    while(EOF!=(ch=nextChar(fp))){
        putchar(ch);
    }
    return 0;
}
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