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Let's say I have some servers, and they are constantly updating a database with their status.

I need to run some reports on the status of these servers. Doing a little cleanup on the tables would really help out.

I get 2 timestamps for each status message (start time and end time). What I'd like to do is take ensuing updates that have the same status, and remove them. I want to update the end time to reflect the proper interval.

Let me illustrate...

server_status table:

server   |    status    |     start_time      |       end_time
---------+------------+---------------------+---------------------
 web1    |  running     | 2013-06-04 00:00:00 | 2013-06-04 00:05:00
 web2    |  down        | 2013-06-04 00:01:00 | 2013-06-04 00:03:00
 web1    |  running     | 2013-06-04 00:05:00 | 2013-06-04 01:00:00
 msdb    |  idle        | 2013-06-04 00:02:00 | 2013-06-04 02:00:00
 web1    |  running     | 2013-06-04 01:00:00 | 2013-06-04 02:00:00
 web2    |  down        | 2013-06-04 00:03:00 | 2013-06-04 03:00:00
 web2    |  running     | 2013-06-04 03:00:00 | 2013-06-04 05:00:00
 web1    |  maintenance | 2013-06-04 02:00:00 | 2013-06-04 05:00:00
 web1    |  running     | 2013-06-04 05:00:00 | 2013-06-04 07:00:00

i'd like my table to end up looking like this (sorted on start_time):

server   |    status    |     start_time      |       end_time
---------+------------+---------------------+---------------------
 web1    |  running     | 2013-06-04 00:00:00 | 2013-06-04 02:00:00
 web2    |  down        | 2013-06-04 00:01:00 | 2013-06-04 03:00:00
 msdb    |  idle        | 2013-06-04 00:02:00 | 2013-06-04 02:00:00
 web1    |  maintenance | 2013-06-04 02:00:00 | 2013-06-04 05:00:00
 web2    |  running     | 2013-06-04 03:00:00 | 2013-06-04 05:00:00
 web1    |  running     | 2013-06-04 05:00:00 | 2013-06-05 07:00:00

This let's me know exactly when my boxes changed states, and then when I run some reports on these tables, I can query BETWEEN the start_time and end_time in SQL.

Any clue how to do this? I'm assuming I'll need an update statement, and then a delete. I can add row numbers if I need to, although they don't currently exist. It may be necessary, so we can sort and then check to see if the server and status at row X is the same at row X + 1.

Running postgres 8.1 (I know, I know. going to 8.4 soon).

share|improve this question
    
Check the row of sample data I added to make sure it's correct both on input and on output. Sample data needs a discontinuous, later row that has the same status as an earlier row. – Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Jun 4 '13 at 18:03
    
yeah. it looks right. i must've missed something. – jasonmclose Jun 4 '13 at 18:24

This is a tricky problem, because you have multiple groups of values for the same (server, status), so a simple GROUP BY or DISTINCT (ON) won't cut it.

However, the window function lag() (available since PostgreSQL 8.4) is a perfect fit for your problem, making the solution surprisingly simple.

To get the values you are looking for in a SELECT:

SELECT server, status, start_time, end_time
FROM  (
   SELECT *, status IS DISTINCT FROM 
             lag(status) OVER (PARTITION BY server ORDER BY start_time) AS step
   FROM   server_status
   ) sub
WHERE  step
ORDER  BY start_time;

Legacy version: this should work with 8.1, too. Only tested with 8.4.
The correlated subquery is probably a lot slower than the window function.

SELECT server, status, start_time, end_time
FROM   server_status s
WHERE ( 
   SELECT s1.status
   FROM   server_status s1
   WHERE  s1.server = s.server
   AND    s1.start_time < s.start_time
   ORDER  BY s1.start_time DESC
   LIMIT  1
   ) IS DISTINCT FROM s.status
ORDER  BY start_time;

->SQLfiddle for both
To DELETE rows as required:

DELETE FROM server_status s
USING (
   SELECT server, status, start_time
         ,status IS DISTINCT FROM
          lag(status) OVER (PARTITION BY server ORDER BY start_time) AS step
   FROM   server_status
   ) d
WHERE  s.server = d.server
AND    s.status = d.status
AND    s.start_time = d.start_time
AND    NOT d.step;

For 8.1. Only tested with 8.4.

DELETE FROM server_status s
WHERE (   
   SELECT s1.status = s.status
   FROM   server_status s1
   WHERE  s1.server = s.server
   AND    s1.start_time < s.start_time
   ORDER  BY s1.start_time DESC
   LIMIT  1
   );

Any index on (server, start_time) will greatly improve performance for bigger tables, for any of these queries.

You need to upgrade, for security reasons alone. (But why stop at 8.4? Go straight to the current version.

share|improve this answer
    
i always get a little flack for the 8.1 thing. the issue is that i am still confined by red hat 5, and RH5 only supports up to 8.4. upgrading postgres hasn't been a priority, so we've still been stuck on 8.1. the move to RH6 will be a nightmare, so that's not happening any time soon. sadly, i can't use this solution without a lot of work to make it fit to 8.1. – jasonmclose Jun 5 '13 at 13:18
    
@jasonmclose: You did mention 8.4 just again, right? You can use it there. – Erwin Brandstetter Jun 5 '13 at 14:57
    
yeah. we will be moving to 8.4 in a few months, but i was hoping to sneak this in under our build that still uses 8.1 – jasonmclose Jun 5 '13 at 16:05
    
@jasonmclose: I gave in and added a legacy version. – Erwin Brandstetter Jun 5 '13 at 16:46

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