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We need to query an 8-million-row table constantly so we decided to create an index for the job.

In the query we use 3 columns in the where condition, it's like

SELECT something 
FROM my_table 
WHERE TRUNC(DATE) = TRUNC(SYSDATE) 
  AND IS_GREETED = 1 
 AND EMP_ID = 'JOHN.SMITH'

So we created index one using EMP_ID only and index two using all these 3 fields (DATE, IS_GREETED, EMP_ID).

With SQL Developer's autotrace function we found out that Oracle is actually using the index one, instead of index two, contrary to what we had thought.

What is the reason for this? Are there other ways we can improve performance? Thanks.

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Please post the execution plan (as text enclosed in <pre> tags, not as a bitmap!) –  a_horse_with_no_name Jun 4 '13 at 15:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Oracle doesn't generally use an index on <column> for a WHERE clause that references function(<column>).

You could try creating an index on (TRUNC(DATE), IS_GREETED, EMP_ID)

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Oracle won't consider the DATE field for the index selection (generally, anyway, not sure if there are exceptions) because you've got a function around it, TRUNC in this case. This is more likely to choose the index you already have for a range scan:

SELECT something 
FROM my_table 
WHERE DATE >= TRUNC(SYSDATE) and DATE < (TRUNC(SYSDATE) + INTERVAL '1' DAY)
AND IS_GREETED = 1 
AND EMP_ID = 'JOHN.SMITH'

... or use a function-based index as Tony showed (not sure how I didn't see that before answering).

Depending on how selective the fields are, you might find the index performs better with the columns in a different order, e.g. EMP_ID, IS_GREETED, DATE. You'll need to look at the plan and experiment to see what gives you the best resulsts.

Incidentally, I hope you field isn't really called DATE as that's a reserved word...

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1  
Oracle may choose the index if it decides that a skip scan would be faster than the alternatives. However, quite unlikely in this instance because of the emp_id index. –  Jeffrey Kemp Jun 5 '13 at 6:14

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