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I'm experiencing kind of a problem here. I'm developing an app that reads files and displays its content in an UITableView. I realised recently that files might get real big and that I'd need to code the actual reading of the files asynchronously. My project is already pretty big and today I managed to wrap the code I already had in an NSOperation.

What I did is that my parser (opening and reading my files) is now called within an NSOperation. Just like that :

@implementation ReadPcapOperation

@synthesize parser =_parser;

- (id) initWithURL:(NSURL *)url linkedTo:(PacketFlowViewController *)packetController
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        _parser = [[PcapParser alloc] initWithURL:url linkedTo:packetController];
    }
    return self;
}

- (void)main {
    // a lengthy operation
    @autoreleasepool {
        if (self.isCancelled)
            return;

        [_parser read];

    }
}

@end

I give you here only the implementation, there's nothing important in the .h file. This NSOperation subclass is called within an NSOperation :

_queue = [NSOperationQueue new];
_queue.name = @"File Parsing Queue";
_queue.maxConcurrentOperationCount = 1;
[_queue addOperation:_readFileOperation];

_readFileOperation is an instance of ReadPcapOperation described above.

Now, when I test my code, still no difference, when I open a file the UI is still blocked while the file content is loading into my UITableView. I tested with this condition :

[NSThread isMainThread]

This test returns NO in main from ReadPcapOperation, which is good, exactly what I need. But this test returns YES when I put it inside the method "read", message sent to an object inside main from ReadPcapOperation ! So my whole code is still running on mainthread and blocks my UI.

What am I missing here, guys ?

Let me know if you need more explanation !

EDIT :

Here is what's weird : I'll post a part of my code that's supposed to be executing in a background thread.

- (void) read
{
    if ([NSThread isMainThread])
        NSLog(@"read: IT S MAIN THREAD");
    else
        NSLog(@"read: IT S NOT MAIN THREAD");

    [_fileStream open];
}

- (void)stream:(NSStream *)stream handleEvent:(NSStreamEvent)eventCode {
    switch(eventCode)
    {
        case NSStreamEventOpenCompleted:
        {
            //We read the pcap file header
            [self readGlobalHeader];
            [self readNextPacket];
            break;
        }
        case NSStreamEventHasBytesAvailable:
        {
            //We read all packets
            [self readNextPacket];
            break;
        }
        case NSStreamEventNone:
        {
            break;
        }
        case NSStreamEventHasSpaceAvailable:
        {
            break;
        }
        case NSStreamEventEndEncountered:
        {
            NSLog(@"End encountered !");
            [_fileStream close];
            [_fileStream removeFromRunLoop:[NSRunLoop currentRunLoop]
                              forMode:NSDefaultRunLoopMode];
            //_fileStream = nil;
            break;
        }
        case NSStreamEventErrorOccurred:
        {
            NSError *theError = [stream streamError];
            NSLog(@"Error %i stream event occured. Domain : %@.", theError.code, theError.domain);
            [stream close];
            break;
        }
    }
}

- (void) readGlobalHeader
{
    if ([NSThread isMainThread])
        NSLog(@"readGlobalHeader: IT S MAIN THREAD");
    else
        NSLog(@"readGlobalHeader: IT S NOT MAIN THREAD");
    int sizeOfGlobalHeader = 24;

Up here you see the method read that I call directly from the NSOperation. The Log there says :"NOT MAIN THREAD". SO far, so good. read opens the NSInputStreamObject and the delegate will then call "handleEvent" and it's at this moment that I read the bytes. When I call "readGlobalHeader" and read the first bytes of my file, the log is "MAIN THREAD". Shouldn't it be in the background thread as well ? I'm really lost there !

What might be important to note is that when I initialize the stream, before caling "read" I set it up with this line of code (I'm not sure it's the cause) :

[_fileStream scheduleInRunLoop:[NSRunLoop currentRunLoop] forMode:NSDefaultRunLoopMode];

EDIT 2: Here's the backtrace after the breakpoints. The behavior is just as I describe it above. (not enought reputation to post images)

Breakpoint at the read method Breakpoint after the stream is open

share|improve this question
    
What does the read method do and where did you log whether it is on the main thread? Set a break point on the log statement that returns YES and post the backtrace. –  bbum Jun 4 '13 at 16:02
    
read is a method that simply sends "open" to a NSInputStream object. I use NSInputStream to read through my file. Once the stream is open I parse the file, read byte after byte and stuff like that. I edited my post, check it out ! –  Starscream Jun 4 '13 at 18:04

5 Answers 5

My guess is the problem lies in how you set up the stream. The line:

[_fileStream scheduleInRunLoop:[NSRunLoop currentRunLoop] forMode:NSDefaultRunLoopMode];

Is being called on the main thread so [NSRunLoop currentRunLoop] is the main thread's runloop, and therefore your delegate callbacks are called on the main thread. The documentation for the NSStreamDelegate protocol stream:handleEvent: method states:

The delegate receives this message only if theStream is scheduled on a run loop. The message is sent on the stream object’s thread. The delegate should examine streamEvent to determine the appropriate action it should take.

I'm guessing that scheduling on the runloop of the main thread means the stream objects thread is then the main thread. (?)

(I read a little bit about run loops and threads in the documentation whilst trying to answer this question, but it's not entirely clear if this is the case. If @bbum follows up he can surely provide a definitive answer).

Assuming that is the problem then you may be able to use the main thread simply to receive events and then pass the work to another thread perhaps by using another NSOperation. Or you may need to create a specific thread and runloop to schedule the stream on.

I read up about a similar situation with NSURLConnection which also uses runloops when receiving delegate callbacks. It was hard to find an example of setting up and managing a runloop in this case, however recently I looked at the code for AFNetworking and saw that this was how they manage their processing for NSURLConnection. I assume that a similar approach would work for streams so you may find that a useful guide.

Of course there may also be better examples of using runloops for streams than there were for NSURLConnection so perhaps look for those first.

Edit: Also you don't mention anything about configuring your operation as a concurrent operation. Unless I'm missing something here, if the delegate callbacks are asynchronous like NSURLConnections are then you have a concurrent operation and need to set it up as such?.

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Largely reiterating the other answers: using an NSOperation like this with the stream API is misguided. They're most useful for numerous chunks of computation-bound tasks. Things like file or network i/o mostly involve waiting and use asynchronous APIs involving either completion blocks or delegates and callback methods.

I seem to remember NSOperation docs not mentioning it much, but they're often pointless when using asynchronous APIs. (Except, as Rory O'Bryan mentioned, when using "concurrent" operations. However, with those you aren't leveraging the background threading nature of operation queues, only their operation management & dependencies, ie. useless if you only have one operation)

What's happening is that [_fileStream open] in your read method is being run in the operation queue and then it quickly returns, and with that the operation finishes. The stream:handleEvent: delegate callbacks aren't called within open but instead some time after it returns. They're called on the main thread no differently than when your code wasn't using NSOperation.

Unlike morningstar's answer, I'm assuming you really need to stick with the stream API (if not, then his answer is valid - convert to synchronous calls and your operation should work as intended).

I say you should revert back to not using the NSOperation - it's not buying you anything. If you like how the _fileStream business is encapsulated in the operation object, convert your operation object into a plain NSObject subclass, and just call its read method.

Look to your readGlobalHeader and readNextPacket methods. They're probably making synchronous calls and that's surely what's blocking the main thread. If that is indeed the case there you have a few options:

  • Follow Ramy Al Zuhouri's suggestion, except use dispatch_async to instead wrap the calls to your readNextPacket etc methods. In theory, you could follow his explicit example and also do that to [_fileStream open], but I'd only do that if you measure that this call takes a long time to return. GCD is an easy way to get those methods to run in a background thread, just read up on setting up your queue correctly.

  • Like Rory O'Bryan suggests, change stream scheduling so that your delegate method is called in a thread you create. Creating threads and runloops can be tricky, but this example looks to show an easy way to do it, though probably not the best. You'd have to at least add something to stop the thread.

    I think the best sequence things should occur in are:

    1. th = [[NSThread alloc] init...]
    2. [_fileStream scheduleInRunLoop:<thread's-runloop> ...]
    3. [th start]
    4. the thread method calls [[NSRunLoop currentRunLoop] run] only once

    Then when the stream is closed, it unscheduled itself from the runloop, the run method returns, and so the thread's method returns, and the thread ends. Note though that I may be wrong, and you may need to put [[NSRunLoop currentRunLoop] run] in a loop after all.

  • Convert readNextPacket etc to use asynchronous APIs. I'd say this probably makes the most sense unless you're doing significant computation in those methods and not just network i/o.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent reiteration! This answer should be re-read until understood. ;) –  CouchDeveloper Jun 5 '13 at 5:44

This happens because stream:handleEvent: being a delegate method, is called on the main thread. I suggest to change your design and to don't use NSOperationQueue, but to make methods like read execute an operation on another thread.

In your case GCD fits very well. So I recommend to use a *dispatch_queue_t* ivar to execute every method that needs to be called asynchronously. In your case read would change this way:

- (void) read
{
    dispatch_async(self.queue, ^
    {
        if ([NSThread isMainThread])
            NSLog(@"read: IT S MAIN THREAD");
        else
            NSLog(@"read: IT S NOT MAIN THREAD");

        [_fileStream open];
    });
}

PS: Remember that the queue needs to be created.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok I see. So what are my options ? I'm not familiar with concurrency and iOS. Would an NSThread do the job ? –  Starscream Jun 4 '13 at 18:43
    
Yes, it would. But in your case since read executes few lines of code and the app is simple, I suggest to use GCD, and to read this article about GCD: cocoasamurai.blogspot.it/2009/09/… –  Ramy Al Zuhouri Jun 4 '13 at 18:47

With your file reading already running in a background thread, you don't need an asynchronous approach like NSStream. Try just using NSFileHandle and readDataOfLength:.

I don't know your file format. If you can determine the size of a record prior to reading it (constant width, or predictable based on something you've read so far), then you can just call readDataOfLength: with the right record size. When it returns, you have your record and add it to the table view. If you can't predict the size of the record, then just call readDataOfLength:1024 and parse through the results. When you find the end of a record, add it. If you run out of data before you find a complete record, call readDataOfLength:1024 again and continue reading from the beginning of the results of that.

Either way, some of the calls to readDataOfLength: will block, but that only blocks your background thread, which doesn't have anything else to do anyway. Keeping a blocked background thread around isn't too costly.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thank you all for your answers they've been so helpful. I solved my problem and here's how :

First my stream delegates method were still called in the main thread and I didn't know why. THis was because I initialized the stream in the init method of my NSOperation class and not in main. So when I called [_fileStream scheduleInRunLoop:[NSRunLoop currentRunLoop] forMode:NSDefaultRunLoopMode]; it was scheduling in in the main thread loop. I solved this issue by initializing _filestream in the NSOperation main and it ran correctly in a background thread.

Then I realized that the background thread was actually finished and destroyed before the delegate's method were called. At this point I completely changed my way of doing background processing. I simply used, as a couple of you suggested, GCD with a dispatch_async. This is actually where I'm using it:

- (void)stream:(NSStream *)stream handleEvent:(NSStreamEvent)eventCode {
    switch(eventCode)
    {
        case NSStreamEventOpenCompleted:
        {
            //We read the pcap file header
            dispatch_async(myqueue, ^
            {
                     [self readGlobalHeader];
                     [self readNextPacket];
             });
            break;
        }
        case NSStreamEventHasBytesAvailable:
        {
            //We read all packets
            [self readNextPacket];
            break;
        }

and it works perfectly. I'm refreshing my UI with a method that I send to the main queue.

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