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Say I have this class:

public class BuzzKill
{
public string Name {get;set;}
public DateTime? StrikeDate {get;set;}
}

If I write an instance of this class to a database with a null StrikeDate, then attempt to update it and save it using the method below (taken from Julia Lehrman's book, DbContext), I receive the following exception:

System.InvalidOperationException : The original value for the property 'StrikeDate' cannot be set to null because the 'StrikeDate' member on the entity type 'BuzzKill' is not nullable.

Obviously, the member is nullable. Does anyone have a workaround or solution? I'm using EF 5.0.

Here is the code I'm using to update entities, along with a comment noting where the exception gets thrown:

 public virtual void ApplyChanges<TEntity>(TEntity root)
            where TEntity : class, IObjectWithState
        {
            using (var context = new AmazingChartsContext())
            {
                context.Set<TEntity>().Add(root);

                CheckForEntitiesWithoutStateInterface(context);

                foreach (var entry in context.ChangeTracker.Entries<IObjectWithState>())
                {
                    IObjectWithState stateInfo = entry.Entity;
                    entry.State = ConvertState(stateInfo.State);
                    if (stateInfo.State == State.Unchanged)
                    {                           
                        ApplyPropertyChanges(entry.OriginalValues, stateInfo.OriginalValues);
                    }
                }

                try
                {
                    context.SaveChanges();
                }
                catch (DbEntityValidationException ex)
                {
                   //stuff...

                }
            }
        }

        protected void ApplyPropertyChanges(DbPropertyValues values, Dictionary<string, object> originalValues)
        {
            foreach (var originalValue in originalValues)
            {
                if (originalValue.Value is Dictionary<string, object>)
                {
                    ApplyPropertyChanges((DbPropertyValues)values[originalValue.Key],
                        (Dictionary<string, object>)originalValue.Value);
                }
                else
                {
                    values[originalValue.Key] = originalValue.Value; //here's where the exception gets thrown
                }
            }
        }

(I read about this issue here, but no one seemed to have an answer other than this was a bug in 4.3.)

share|improve this question
1  
Are you using .NET 4.0 or .NET 4.5? If .NET 4.0 you most likely still suffer from this bug because Rowan Miller said in that thread that the bug is in EF 4.0 core libraries (which EF 5 on .NET 4.0 is still using). For .NET 4.5 you should not have the problem because the following thread indicates that the bug has been fixed in .NET 4.5: social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/zh-TW/adodotnetentityframework/… – Slauma Jun 4 '13 at 20:00
    
Thanks, I found that yesterday shortly after posting and am looking into converting to 4.5 right now. I built a toy project to test it out and it looks as though my problem goes away with 4.5. I'm going to confirm on our actual code base today. Thanks for your response. – RobC Jun 5 '13 at 13:58
    
Just dawned on me that this isn't an option, since a good number of our customers still run XP, which doesn't support 4.5. Oh well, back to the drawing board... – RobC Jun 5 '13 at 14:49

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