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I have already asked about memory leaks on Android but I don't know memory leaks well yet. Now I have to hold some data received by PhoneStateListener. The Singleton pattern comes in handy because I should guarantee that the only one instance exists.

public class PhoneStateInfo {

    /** -1 until the first reception */
    private int mCid = -1;
    /** -1 until the first reception */
    private int mLac = -1;
    /** 0 until the first reception */
    private int mMcc;
    /** 0 until the first reception */
    private int mMnc;
    // And so on...

    private static PhoneStateInfo INSTANCE = new PhoneStateInfo();

    public static PhoneStateInfo getInstance() {
        return INSTANCE;
    }

    private PhoneStateInfo() {}

    /**
     * Reverts the single instance to its initial state
     * But if I have 10 or 20 fields which have various default values, it will be easy to forget something
     */
    void clear() {
        mCid = -1;
        mLac = -1;
        mMcc = 0;
        mMnc = 0;
        mRssi = -1;
        mSimState = TelephonyManager.SIM_STATE_UNKNOWN;
        mDeviceId = null;
        mSubscriberId = null;
        mPhoneNumber = null;
    }

    /**
     * Reverts the single instance to its initial state
     * Short and clear
     */
    static void clearInstance() {
        INSTANCE = null; // If I delete this line, memory leaks will occur
        // because the old reference is left alive will not be garbage-collected
        INSTANCE = new PhoneStateInfo();
    }
}

Please see the clear() and clearInstance() methods. Are my comments correct there?

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IMHO Using public enum PhoneStateInfo { INSTANCE; is much simpler. You should not need to destroy and recreate this class, you have a claer(); method. –  Peter Lawrey Jun 4 '13 at 17:58
    
@PeterLawrey, thanks. I also read about the enum pattern in the book called "Effective Java". –  Maksim Dmitriev Jun 5 '13 at 9:57
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
 INSTANCE = null; // If I delete this line, memory leaks will occur
 // because the old reference is left alive will not be garbage-collected
 INSTANCE = new PhoneStateInfo();

That is not true.

You don't have to set the field to null before assigning it to the new value. You can just override it with the new value.

You may want to set it to null if there is no new value (to get rid of an instance that you no longer need and let the garbage collector get at it).

But even if you did not, I wouldn't call it "memory leak" because it is very bounded by virtue of there being just one instance. Even if unused, the memory consumption does not gradually get bigger over time, which you would normally have with a "leak".

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static void clearInstance() {
    INSTANCE = null; // If I delete this line, memory leaks will occur
    // because the old reference is left alive will not be garbage-collected
    INSTANCE = new PhoneStateInfo();
}

That comment is incorrect. The first line does basically nothing. You are changing INSTANCE to not point to the old PhoneStateInfo anymore, but assigning a new PhoneStateInfo also accomplishes the same task of making it not point to the old one anymore!

You can't really be sure from here if the old PhoneStateInfo will be Garbage Collected or not. If another piece of code somewhere has created a reference to it, it's not eligible for collection until that reference is also gone.

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Your comments are not correct in case of plain java program.

There is no need to set null for object to mark it avaliable for GC.

But if your program is using custom ClassLoaders, WeakReference, ThreadLocals it might leak.

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