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I am working my way through Principles and Practice Using C++. I've been understanding it kind of well but I've hit a wall recently with chapter 6. You are suppose to start writing a calculator program and it gradually becomes more feature rich as you continue on to it. It eventually leads into tokens which is confusing the heck out of me.

ANYWHO! my question is that I'm following this code and it isn't working as it is explaining. I've gone over the code against the book several times and it looks similar. The code just keeps taking in lval and not doing anything with it. After 3 cin entries it will just show me whatever lval was first set to. I'm also not 100% sure on the use of cin >> op in the while loop. What makes it stop? When does it know to stop? The error function doesn't seem to work either. I keep trying to break the program but it doesn't pop up any of the error messages.

This is just frustrating because I'm learning and It's hard for me to figure my own problems out without a mentor :/ Thanks everyone for your time though! incoming code...it's what I have so far

#include "std_lib_facilities.h"

int main()
{
    cout << "Please enter an expression (we can handle ""+"",""-"",""*"",""/"")" << endl;
    int lval = 0;
    int rval;
    char op;
    /*int res;*/
    cin >> lval; //read left most number
    if (!cin) error("No first operand");

    while (cin >> op) //Repeatedly read operand and right value
    {
        cin >> rval;
        if (!cin) error("No second operand");
        switch(op)
        {
        case '+':
            lval += rval; //add: lval = lval + rval
            break;
        case '-':
            lval -=rval;//subtract: lval = lval - rval
            break;
        case '*':
            lval *= rval; //Multiply: lval = lval * rval
            break;
        case '/':
            lval /= rval; //Divide: lval = lval / rval
            break;
        default:
            cout << "Result: " << lval << endl;
            keep_window_open();
            return 0;
        }
    }
    error("Bad expression");
}

P.S. I tried using break points to see how to code works line by line, but it starts throwing me into the iostream files and I have no clue how to read those at this point!

share|improve this question
    
In your strings, the sequence "" does nothing. It will simply end the first string and start a second string. Lucky for you the compiler will consider two consecutive strings as a single string. –  Joachim Pileborg Jun 4 '13 at 18:21
    
is this your complete code? if yes, you are missing iostream and std namespace..... –  Bill Jun 4 '13 at 18:21
    
@Joachim Pileborg Could you maybe explain that a little more? Are you talking about the double "" in the first cout? –  Token coding newbie Jun 4 '13 at 18:23
    
Yes, that's correct. –  Joachim Pileborg Jun 4 '13 at 18:24
    
@Bill I think the #include "std_lib_facilities.h" adds all of that stuff, it wouldn't compile other wise, right? –  Token coding newbie Jun 4 '13 at 18:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It does sort of work. For instance if you introduce the following sequence:

3 <enter>
+ <enter>
3 <enter>
d <enter>
3 <enter>

It produces:

Result: 6

The reason is cin always expects an enter to finish. There is also an error in the logic and even when you want to stop the execution you have to introduce an extra dummy value. To solve that you must check the operator before asking for the rval.

EDIT:

Probably this would be close to what you want:

#include "iostream"
#include <cstdio>

 using namespace std;

 int main()
 {
     cout << "Please enter an expression (we can handle ""+"",""-"",""*"",""/    "")" << endl;
     int lval = 0;
     int rval;
     char op;
     /*int res;*/
     cin >> lval; //read left most number
     if (!cin) printf("No first operand");

     while (cin >> op) //Repeatedly read operand and right value
     {
         if(op != '+' && op != '-' && op != '*' && op != '/')
         {
             cout << "Result: " << lval << endl;
             //keep_window_open();
             getchar();
             return 0;
         }

         cin >> rval;
         if (!cin) printf("No second operand");
         switch(op)
         {
             case '+':
                 lval += rval; //add: lval = lval + rval
                 break;
             case '-':
                 lval -=rval;//subtract: lval = lval - rval
                 break;
             case '*':
                 lval *= rval; //Multiply: lval = lval * rval
                 break;
             case '/':
                 lval /= rval; //Divide: lval = lval / rval
                 break;
         }
     }
     printf("Bad expression");
 }
share|improve this answer
    
So is it no coincidence that tokens is the next part of the chapter following this code? –  Token coding newbie Jun 4 '13 at 18:42
    
@user2442335 problably not... I haven't read the book so I don't know about the context but it is usual that authors would introduce defective code as example to show after how can the problem can be solved. –  Pedrom Jun 4 '13 at 18:44
    
My issue was it didn't explain much about the faulty code. I didn't know about the cin thing until you posted about it. It makes more sense. The only thing bugging me now is the use of cin in the if checks and loop. I just can't comprehend it for some reason! –  Token coding newbie Jun 4 '13 at 18:49
    
@user2442335 The while is intended to chain several operations so you could do 3+3-4*5d0 and it would give you (3+3-4*5) –  Pedrom Jun 4 '13 at 18:52
    
I think I get it from tinkering around trying to break the easily broken code. The loop just keeps alternating from op to rval with every entry after lval right?How does it know not to throw 3+3+3+3 into lval? How does it know when it should stop? Sorry If these are dumb questions but I'm learning so much more here than reading :) –  Token coding newbie Jun 4 '13 at 18:55

Dismiss the default statement, maybe you should not use default for displaying the result. Try this:

#include "std_lib_facilities.h"

int main()
{
    cout << "Please enter an expression (we can handle ""+"",""-"",""*"",""/"")" << endl;
    int lval = 0;
    int rval;
    char op;
    /*int res;*/
    cin >> lval; //read left most number
    if (!cin) error("No first operand");

    while (cin >> op) //Repeatedly read operand and right value
    {
        cin >> rval;
        if (!cin) error("No second operand");
        switch(op)
        {
        case '+':
            lval += rval; //add: lval = lval + rval
            break;
        case '-':
            lval -=rval;//subtract: lval = lval - rval
            break;
        case '*':
            lval *= rval; //Multiply: lval = lval * rval
            break;
        case '/':
            lval /= rval; //Divide: lval = lval / rval
            break;
        }
        cout << "Result: " << lval << endl;
        keep_window_open();
        return 0;
    }
    error("Bad expression");
}

this should work.

share|improve this answer
3  
This is not a solution, the code is intended to perform several operations and your solution would execute just once. In other words that while is redundant and it is changing the intention of the logic –  Pedrom Jun 4 '13 at 18:49
1  
What harm does it do using default to display the results? –  Token coding newbie Jun 4 '13 at 18:49
1  
I think his logic maybe wrong if you input 3+4*2, it will give 14 I think, so I assume he just wants two operand. –  Jiang Jun 4 '13 at 19:01
    
@Pedrom not only that, he didn't change the unescaped quotes either –  imulsion Jun 4 '13 at 19:01
1  
The logic is wrong on purpose. It's to show how to take a basic program idea and then build on it to make it feature rich. –  Token coding newbie Jun 4 '13 at 19:21

The problem comes with your first outputted line. Instead of two sets of quotes, you need to escape one set with a backslash, telling C++ to treat the quotes as a character rather than the start or end of a string. Also, your while loop seems to test a very odd condition. I don't know what has gone wrong, but it just continually takes in the operator and (presumably) the code in the while loop never gets executed. A better code solution is below.

#include "std_lib_facilities.h"

int main()
{
    cout << "Please enter an expression (we can handle \"+\",\"-\",\"*\",\"/\")" << endl;
    int lval = 0;
    int rval;
    int loop = 1;
    char op;
    /*int res;*/
    while (loop == 1) //Repeatedly calculate
    {
    cout<<"Please enter the first number"<<endl;
    cin >> lval; //read left most number
    if (!cin) error("No first operand");
    cout<<"Please enter operator"<<endl;
    cin >> op;
    cout<<"Please enter second number"<<endl;
    cin >> rval;
    if (!cin) error("No second operand");
    switch(op)
        {
        case '+':
            lval += rval; //add: lval = lval + rval
            break;
        case '-':
            lval -=rval;//subtract: lval = lval - rval
            break;
        case '*':
            lval *= rval; //Multiply: lval = lval * rval
            break;
        case '/':
            lval /= rval; //Divide: lval = lval / rval
            break;
        default:
            cout << "Result: " << lval << endl;
            keep_window_open();
            return 0;
        }
    cout<<"Enter 1 to calculate a new expression, or 0 to exit."<<endl;
    cin>>loop;
    }
    error("Bad expression");
}
share|improve this answer
    
I thought the while loop was odd. I've only been coding for like a week, but it looked like the loop was pointless? Doesn't the default return 0; end the program? If I use cin like that in a while loop wouldn't it just keep asking me for data over and over and over? Thanks for the rewritten code, it makes a lot more sense than the C++ creators code to me XD –  Token coding newbie Jun 4 '13 at 18:47
    
@user2442335 That's fine. If i've helped, please consider accepting my answer. That calculator was very overcomplicated. –  imulsion Jun 4 '13 at 18:59
    
Actually, the usage of double quotes isn't the real issue. See my comment below Jiang's answer. –  greatwolf Jun 4 '13 at 20:03

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