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How does IPython handle local variables? I have this function that works in the python shell but will not work in the IPython shell. Can anyone help please?

def change(key,value):
    global aname
    global alist
    alist.append(key)
    aname.extend(value)

I am using this inside of a for loop and which is reading inputting in from a json and other txt files and adding the keys and value to a list which is then used by another function to save to the database. If I do not do it this way it will be ugly and will use the indexes in my loop

[change(key,value) for key,value in jsondata.itervalues()]

def storeindatabase():
    do_sothing to the list aname and store
    do_sothing to the alist and store
share|improve this question
    
I am using this inside of a for loop and which is reading inputting in from a json and other txt files and adding the keys and value to a list which is then used by another function to save to the database. if am not doing it this way it will be ugly and ill the using indexes in my loop –  user1940979 Jun 4 '13 at 18:38
    
Doesn't matter. If you're not using = to assign to the name in your function, global does nothing whatsoever. –  Wooble Jun 4 '13 at 18:47
    
protip the first word of sentences is generally capitalized a period or other terminal punctuation usually follows it is nearly impossible to read sentences that are run together please help us read write better –  kindall Jun 4 '13 at 19:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  1. using globals means wrong engineering. If you need a global, that means you need to redesign your code. That's even more true in python.
  2. when you do really want to use a global (maybe the only acceptable case: singleton, though in python, you'd only scope the singleton more globally than where you use it...), you need to declare your variable as global, and then attribute it a value.

for example:

  global bar
  bar = []
  def foobar():
    bar.append('X')

RTFM:

about the ipython part, my example does work:

In [1]: global bar

In [2]: bar = []

In [3]: def foo():
   ...:     bar.append(3)
   ...:     

In [4]: foo()

In [5]: foo()

In [6]: foo()

In [7]: bar
Out[7]: [3, 3, 3]

and here is another example, that shows global is indeed working, and not the outter scoping:

In [2]: def foo():
   ...:     global bar
   ...:     bar = []
   ...:     

In [3]: def oof():
   ...:     bar.append('x')
   ...:     

In [4]: foo()

In [5]: oof()

In [6]: oof()

In [7]: oof()

In [8]: oof()

In [9]: bar
Out[9]: ['x', 'x', 'x', 'x']

anyway, globals are evil!

share|improve this answer
    
can u try ur own example in ipthon it will not work that is what i want to know and why thanks –  user1940979 Jun 4 '13 at 19:07

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