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I am trying to get the names of all first level directories under given path.

I tried to use File::Find but had problems.

Can someone help me with that?

share|improve this question
up vote 14 down vote accepted

Use the-d file check operator:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;

my $path = $ARGV[0];
die "Please specify which directory to search" 
    unless -d $path;

opendir( my $DIR, $path );
while ( my $entry = readdir $DIR ) {
    next unless -d $path . '/' . $entry;
    next if $entry eq '.' or $entry eq '..';
    print "Found directory $entry\n";
}
closedir $DIR;
share|improve this answer
1  
As an example, it's good enough, isn't it? – Nathan Fellman Nov 7 '09 at 11:22
1  
Ah! He's one of the guys that use spaces before their punctuation. I really thought he meant "give path '.'". I'll change my answer accordingly – innaM Nov 7 '09 at 11:28
2  
And that's what why you voted this down? What the hell is wrong today? – innaM Nov 7 '09 at 11:39
3  
OK. So I edited this to check the return value of opendir. I refuse to check closedir's return value though, unless somebody tells me what the script should do should closedir fail. – innaM Nov 7 '09 at 12:15
4  
Yes, it'll probably miss the directory named "0". Could I please have the next downvote now because I didn't post the unit tests? And what if someone pulls the hard drive's plug while the script is running? – innaM Nov 7 '09 at 16:56

If you don't need to traverse the entire directory hierarchy, File::Slurp is much easier to use than File::Find.

use strict;
use warnings;
use File::Slurp qw( read_dir );
use File::Spec::Functions qw( catfile );

my $path = shift @ARGV;
my @sub_dirs = grep { -d } map { catfile $path, $_ } read_dir $path;
print $_, "\n" for @sub_dirs;

And if you ever do need to traverse a hierarchy, check CPAN for friendlier alternatives to File::Find.

Finally, in the spirit of TIMTOWTDI, here's something quick and sleazy:

my @sub_dirs = grep {-d} glob("$ARGV[0]/*");
share|improve this answer
use File::Spec::Functions qw( catfile );

my ($path) = @ARGV;

opendir my $DIR, $path 
    or die "Cannot open directory: '$path': $!";

while ( my $entry = readdir $DIR ) {
    next if $entry =~ /\A\.\.?\z/;
    next unless -d catfile $path, $entry;
    print $entry, "\n";
}

closedir $DIR;

This worked for me.

share|improve this answer
    
Are you asking about directories under '.' like you question implies or are you asking about subdirectories of a directory that is given as a command line argument? – innaM Nov 7 '09 at 10:56
    
subdirectories of a directory that is given as a command line argument – Night Walker Nov 7 '09 at 11:18
    
I changed my answer accordingly. – innaM Nov 7 '09 at 11:34
1  
can you explain this regex plz /\A\.\.?\z/ – Night Walker Nov 7 '09 at 11:50
    
You need to check the return value of readdir() , otherwise it will break if there is a file named 0 . ( Although this should be fixed for Perl 5.11.2 ) – Brad Gilbert Nov 7 '09 at 15:04

I'm running ActivePerl 5.10.1 under Windows XP. If I wanted to get all the names of the directories under the root drive F. I would use the following code:

#!perl
opendir (DIR,'F:/');
my @folder = readdir(DIR);
foreach my $f (@folder)
{
   next if ($f =~ /\./);
   print "$f\n";
 }

Well, this usually works because my folder names do not contain the dot. Otherwise it fails.

Okay, it seems that even my method works for my case, people would still downvote because it is faulty. So I'd have to use the official approach, the -d flag to check if a file is a directory:

The upgraded code:

#!perl
use strict;
use warnings;

opendir (DIR, "F:/");
my @files = readdir(DIR);
my @dirs = grep { -d } @files;
print @dirs;
share|improve this answer
    
I have a file that called "makefile" with no . extension and it was included in your check . – Night Walker Nov 7 '09 at 9:41
    
My method is faulty. It only works if the file names contain the dot extension and the folder names do not contain the dot. Looks like Manni's solution works much better for your case. – Mike Nov 7 '09 at 10:08
    
+1 For trying to be helpful :) – Andomar Nov 7 '09 at 11:54

Use opendir and -d.

share|improve this answer
1  
what do you mean by -f ? perldoc.perl.org/functions/opendir.html – Night Walker Nov 7 '09 at 9:19
    
I should have read my post before pressing 'add comment'. I meant to write -d – René Nyffenegger Nov 7 '09 at 10:34

Using File::Find::Rule

#!/usr/bin/perl --
use strict;
use warnings;

use Shell::Command qw( rm_rf touch mkpath );
use autodie;
use File::Find::Rule;

Main(@ARGV);
exit(0);

sub Main{
  use autodie;
  my $dir = "tmp";
  mkdir $dir;
#~   chdir $dir;
  mkpath "$dir/a/b/c/d";
  mkpath "$dir/as/b/c/d";
  mkpath "$dir/ar/b/c/d";

  print `tree`;
  print "---\n";
  print "$_\n"
    for File::Find::Rule->new->maxdepth(1)->directory->in($dir);

  print "---\n";

  print "$_\n"
    for grep -d, glob "$dir/*"; ## use forward slashes, See File::Glob

#~   chdir "..";
  rm_rf $dir;
}
__END__
.
|-- test.pl
`-- tmp
    |-- a
    |   `-- b
    |       `-- c
    |           `-- d
    |-- ar
    |   `-- b
    |       `-- c
    |           `-- d
    `-- as
        `-- b
            `-- c
                `-- d

13 directories, 1 file
---
tmp
tmp/a
tmp/ar
tmp/as
---
tmp/a
tmp/ar
tmp/as

Or using File::Find::Rule frontend findrule

$ findrule tmp -maxdepth ( 1 ) -directory
tmp
tmp/a
tmp/ar
tmp/as
share|improve this answer

You could use File::Find for that. For example:

use File::Find ();

File::Find::find(\&wanted, '.');

sub wanted {
    if (-d) {    
        print "$File::Find::name\n";
    }
}

For each file found under '.', this will call the wanted subroutine. Inside the subroutine you can use -d to check for a directory.

File::Find:find descends to all subdirectories in the tree below the directory specified.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, this is not a good substitute for readdir or File::Slurp::read_dir. – Sinan Ünür Nov 7 '09 at 11:50
    
Can you explain that? I personally think read_dir is not a good substitute for this ;) – Andomar Nov 7 '09 at 11:53

you can use find2perl to translate your find command to perl. See perldoc find2perl for more info.

Workaround of maxdepth: (reference from Randall)

$  find2perl /home/path -type d -eval 'my $slashes = $File::Find::name =~ tr#/##;return $File::Find::prune = 1 if $slashes > 2;return if $slashes ==2'

Code:

   use strict;
    use File::Find ();
    use vars qw/*name *dir *prune/;
    *name   = *File::Find::name;
    *dir    = *File::Find::dir;
    *prune  = *File::Find::prune;
    sub wanted;

    File::Find::find({wanted => \&wanted}, '/');
    exit;
    sub wanted {
        eval { my $slashes = $File::Find::name =~ tr#/##;return $File::Find::prune = 1 if $slashes > 1;return if $slashes ==1 };
        if ( $? == "0" && -d _  ){
            print "$name --- \n";   
        }
    }

output

$ pwd
/temp

$ tree
.
|-- dir1
|   |-- subdir1
|   |   |-- subsubdir1
|   |   `-- testsubdir1.txt
|   `-- testdir1.txt
|-- dir2
|   |-- subdir2
|   |   |-- subsubdir2
|   |   `-- testsubdir2.txt
|   `-- testdir2.txt
|-- dir3
|   `-- subdir3
|       `-- subsubdir3
`-- test

9 directories, 5 files

$ perl perl.pl
/temp ---
/temp/dir3 ---
/temp/dir1 ---
/temp/dir2 ---
share|improve this answer
    
to the down-voter, explain why you down vote, if you dare. – ghostdog74 Nov 7 '09 at 11:27
    
I did not vote your answer down, however: find2perl C:/ -maxdepth 1 gives Unrecognized switch: -maxdepth – Sinan Ünür Nov 7 '09 at 11:36
    
What do you mean "if you dare"? Are you going to somehow punish him for explaining his reasons? – innaM Nov 7 '09 at 11:37
1  
@ghostdog74 Seriously ... Did you actually look at the generated code or try running it under directory with a large tree under it. It has been going through my C:\Windows for about a minute now. I would say readdir and/or File::Slurp::read_dir are perfectly fine and there is really no need for File::Find here. – Sinan Ünür Nov 7 '09 at 13:40
1  
Yes, there's more than one way to do it. But not each possible way can be the best (or even good). – innaM Nov 7 '09 at 14:27

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