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Is there a way to block javascript until requirejs has loaded the files?

I thought doing the following would work because I don't have a callback.

var requireFile = require(['example']);

but it is still asynchronous.

If I do have a callback specified is there a way to block until example is loaded, then execute the callback.

For example.

require(['example'], function(){
    console.log('hello');
});
console.log('world');

Console should therefore be:

-hello

-world

I am seeing

-world

-hello

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2 Answers 2

You can wrap the code you want to delay in a function, then call that function from the require callback.

require(['example'], function(){
    console.log('hello');
    world();
});

function world() {
  console.log('world');
}
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This approach works like a champ. Drop in a little bit of async and baby, you got a stew goin' –  Todd Morrison Oct 4 at 19:57

You can't block until it returns. But you usually don't have to.

You probably have some code that depends on the return from 'require', that code needs to go in the callback (or get called from inside the callback)

It can be a problem when you already have a bunch of code but its the only way to do it.

Sometimes you can have the other code not run until it sees that something it needs has loaded.

Sometimes you can just skip it running and it will get invoked later. Sometimes you have to set up a timer that keeps looking for that 'something' and then pausing a bit if not.

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Yeh, I have code elsewhere which needs the callback to execute. Moving that code into the callback isn't really an option because of the way our framework works –  Decrypter Jun 4 '13 at 18:48
    
Thanks for the advice. Is there a way to check if requirejs has finished loading? –  Decrypter Jun 4 '13 at 20:12
    
The best way is to see if whatever it loads is present and active. Usually it defines something in the window or document or adds some values or functions to some DOM elements. Check for those being active. –  Lee Meador Jun 4 '13 at 20:23

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