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I've some functions, stored in a collection/array and would like to get the key (function-name) without retyping it. Is there any short way to access it?

var functions_collection = {
    "function_x": function() {
        var name = "function_x";
        // name = this.key; <- how to get the key/function-name "function_x"?

        // some more code like:
        $(".function_x .button").val();

        alert(name);
    }
}

Edit: I'd like to avoid retyping the "function_x" inside the function itself and prefer to call it like this.key.

Sorry for the weird topic and thanks in advance!

Solution: A lot of good answers, but I was just looking for this snipped:

Object.keys(this)
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can you give the use case, why you need this? –  itz2k13 Jun 4 '13 at 18:39
    
@itz2k13 There are some CSS-classes named as the functions. Inside the function I need to use them like $(".function_x .button").html("123"); and would like to keep my code as clean as possible. –  Mr. Bombastic Jun 4 '13 at 18:43
1  
You can call var name = Object.keys(this) (or use getOwnPropertyNames) to get a list of the keys in the object. Won't get you just the parent key unless there is only one ? –  adeneo Jun 4 '13 at 18:46
1  
Why don't you use your CSS-class name as a parameter for a function? –  Artyom Neustroev Jun 4 '13 at 18:57
    
@adeneo your answer is all I need, I guess. Why did you just post a comment instead of an answer? –  Mr. Bombastic Jun 4 '13 at 18:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To get the name of the objects keys, you can use Object.getOwnPropertyNames(this) or in newer browsers just Object.keys(this), and that will get you an array of all and any keys the this object has :

var functions_collection = {
    function_x: function() {
        var name = Object.keys(this);
        console.log(name);
    }
}

FIDDLE

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I'm not sure it's what you want but you can do this :

    var functions_collection = {};
    (function(name){
       functions_collection[name] = function(){
           // use name, which is the function
           alert(name);
       };
    })("function_x");

I'm not really sure it's better. But depending on your (unspecified) goal, there's probably a better solution.

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Not the answer I was looking for but very good to know for some code in the future. Thanks a lot! +1 –  Mr. Bombastic Jun 6 '13 at 7:45

In my opinion you´d need to change you above code since you are having anonymous functions which have no name - a change like this should work:

var functions_collection = {
  'function_x' : function function_x () {
    var myName = arguments.callee.name;
    alert(myName);
  }
}

see http://jsfiddle.net/9cN5q/1/

share|improve this answer
    
+1, But I am curious why on the local this doesn't work, but in jsFiddle, it works. –  Ionică Bizău Jun 4 '13 at 18:50
    
This only works if you type your function name two times in a declaration. The most common way is assigning anonymous function to an object property (gives "" in alert). –  Artyom Neustroev Jun 4 '13 at 18:52
    
If it is anonymous it HAS NO name, thats why its called anonymous ;) –  luk2302 Jun 4 '13 at 18:54
    
In the OP's question it IS anonymous. He wants to know the object's key for which the function was called. –  Artyom Neustroev Jun 4 '13 at 18:54
    
Not the downvoter, but it was probably because arguments.callee is considered bad practice. –  Justin Morgan Jun 4 '13 at 18:59

Supposing that the variable name has the same name as its containing function:

var keys = [];
for (var p in functions_collection) {
    if (typeof(functions_collection[p]) == 'function') {
        keys.push(p);
    }
}

And there you have it, an array with all the function names.

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There are several ways you could go here. Some are good ideas, some are not.

First, some bad ideas

  • arguments.callee.name: This translates most directly to what you ask. arguments.callee is a reference to the function you're currently in. However, it's considered bad practice, and you should avoid using it unless you have a really good reason.

  • Currying: Construct a new function, with the name bound to it as a local variable:

    var functions_collection = (function() {
        var uncurried = {
           "function_x": function(name) {
              alert(name);
           },
           //more functions
       };
       var curried = {};
       for (var name in uncurried) {
          curried[name] = uncurried[name].bind(undefined, name);
       }
       return curried;
    })();
    

    Currying is very useful in JavaScript, and it should work here. However, it's a bit advanced, and it's definitely hard to read. Consider carefully whether you and your team are comfortable writing or maintaining it.

  • Use a local parameter and call the function iteratively:

    var functions_collection = {
         "function_x": function(name) {
             alert(name);
         },
         //more functions
    };
    for (var name in functions_collection) {
        functions_collection[name](name);
    }
    

    Getting better, but it's still hard to read, and it continues the trend of coupling your function names to class names. This is bad for reasons I'll explain below.

Now the "right" way

  • Change your approach. Forget trying to recycle the function name, just use a local variable:

    var functions_collection = {
        "function_x": function() {
             var name = "function_x"; //or "foo" or any other class name
             alert(name);
         },
         //more functions
    };
    functions_collection.function_x();
    

    Or a parameter:

    var functions_collection = {
        "function_x": function(name) {
             alert(name);
         },
         //more functions
    };
    functions_collection.function_x("function_x"); //or any other class name
    

    Now you can use any class, even if it doesn't match the function name:

    functions_collection.function_x("function_y");
    functions_collection.function_x("class_z");
    functions_collection.function_x("foo");
    

I've saved the simplest for last, because I think you're making a mistake by trying to be "clever", if that makes sense. There are significant risks in your approach. For example, you're coupling your HTML very tightly with your JS. What happens if you rename one of your classes? The JavaScript probably breaks, since your functions have to have the same names as your DOM classes. What do you get in exchange for this inflexibility? You save an extra line at the beginning of each function. Not worth it, IMHO.

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