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I'm trying to understand type families without much success. Here's a minimal example:

{-# LANGUAGE TypeFamilies #-}

class Object obj where
  type Unit obj :: *
  unit :: Unit obj

instance (Object obj, Object obj') => Object (obj, obj') where
  type Unit (obj, obj') = (Unit obj, Unit obj')
  unit = (unit, unit)

The intent is fairly transparent I think (trying to define a product category).

This gives me:

objs.hs:10:10:
    Could not deduce (Unit obj' ~ Unit obj1)
    from the context (Object obj, Object obj')
      bound by the instance declaration at objs.hs:8:10-56
    NB: `Unit' is a type function, and may not be injective
    The type variable `obj1' is ambiguous
    Possible fix: add a type signature that fixes these type variable(s)
    Expected type: Unit (obj, obj')
      Actual type: (Unit obj0, Unit obj1)
    In the expression: (unit, unit)
    In an equation for `unit': unit = (unit, unit)
    In the instance declaration for `Object (obj, obj')'

I have tried to add type signatures:

unit = (unit :: Unit obj, unit :: Unit obj') 

but this only makes things worse.

The following modification compiles:

{-# LANGUAGE TypeFamilies #-}

class Object obj where
  type Unit obj :: *
  unit :: obj -> Unit obj

instance (Object obj, Object obj') => Object (obj, obj') where
  type Unit (obj, obj') = (Unit obj, Unit obj')
  unit (o, o') = (unit o, unit o')

but I don't like the superfluous argument for unit.

Is it possible to define the argument-less unit?

share|improve this question
up vote 20 down vote accepted

What you're trying to do is tricky for GHC, because as GHC says in the error message, type families do indeed not need to be injective.

What does injectivity mean?

A type function F is called injective if F x ~ F y implies x ~ y. If F is a normal type constructor, defined via data, then this is always true. For type families, however, it does not hold.

For example, there's no problem in defining the following instances, given your definition of Object:

instance Object Int where
  type Unit Int = Int
  unit = 0

instance Object Char where
  type Unit Char = Int
  unit = 1

Now if you write unit :: Int, then how could GHC possibly determine if it should evaluate to 0 or 1? Not even writing unit :: Unit Int makes it really more clear, because

Unit Int ~ Int ~ Unit Char

so all three types are supposed to be interchangeable. As Unit isn't guaranteed to be injective, there's simply no way to uniquely conclude from the knowledge of Unit x the knowledge of x ...

The consequence is that unit can be defined, but not used.

Solution 1: Dummy or proxy arguments

You have listed the most common way of fixing this problem already. Add an argument that helps GHC to actually determine the type argument in question, by changing the type signature to

unit :: obj -> Unit obj

or

unit :: Proxy obj -> Unit obj

for a suitable definition of Proxy, for example simply

data Proxy a

Solution 2: Manually proving invertibility

A perhaps lesser known option is that you can actually prove to GHC that your type function is invertible.

The way to do that is to define an inverse type family

type family UnUnit obj :: *

and make the invertibility a superclass constraint of the type class:

class (UnUnit (Unit obj) ~ obj) => Object obj where
  type Unit obj :: *
  unit :: Unit obj

Now you have to do extra work. For every instance of the class, you have to define the actual inverse of Unit correctly. For example,

instance (Object obj, Object obj') => Object (obj, obj') where
  type Unit (obj, obj') = (Unit obj, Unit obj')
  unit = (unit, unit)

type instance UnUnit (obj, obj') = (UnUnit obj, UnUnit obj')

But given this modification, the definition typechecks. Now if GHC encounters a call the unit at some specific type T and wants to determine a type S such that Unit S ~ T, it can apply the superclass constraint to infer that

S ~ UnUnit (Unit S) ~ UnUnit T

If we'd now try to define bad instances as above for Object Int and Object Char which both map Unit Int and Unit Char to both be Int, that wouldn't work, because we'd have to decide whether UnObject Int should be Int or Char, but couldn't have both ...

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome answer, great solution, well explained. – AndrewC Jun 4 '13 at 21:31
1  
I had no idea you could prove injectivity! That's great! – J. Abrahamson Jun 4 '13 at 22:43
    
Can't you also use data Unit obj :: * to prove injectivity? I thought that was the whole point of the data variant. – Carl Jun 5 '13 at 0:54
    
Awesome, thanks! I wish the actual error message of GHC would be that clear. – n.m. Jun 5 '13 at 4:01
1  
Data families are always injective. I didn't include them as a "solution" because they're often very inconvenient to use. – kosmikus Jun 7 '13 at 9:23

Since associated types are not injective (defined below) you need an argument in order to type check. For instance, consider the following (incorrect) code.

class Valuable o where
  type Value o :: *
  value :: Value o

data Pearl
data Diamond

instance Valuable Pearl where
  type Value Pearl = Int
  value = 1000

instance Valuable Diamond where
  type Value Diamond = Int
  value = 10000

Note that Value a ~ Value b does not imply a ~ b as injectivity would have it. Thus it's now ambiguous as to what the value of value is. It doesn't even help if we constrict the type of value :: Int since Value Pearl ~ Value Diamond ~ Int.


That said, there's some very nice parallelism in the code.

import Control.Arrow

class Object obj where
  type Unit obj :: *
  unit :: obj -> Unit obj

instance (Object obj, Object obj') => Object (obj, obj') where
  type Unit (obj, obj') = (Unit obj, Unit obj')
  unit = unit *** unit
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