Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wrote a small Console application to test the sizeof operator:

public class Program
{
    public static unsafe void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // Native
        Console.WriteLine("The size of bool is {0}.", sizeof(bool));
        Console.WriteLine("The size of short is {0}.", sizeof(short));
        Console.WriteLine("The size of int is {0}.", sizeof(int));
        Console.WriteLine("The size of long is {0}.", sizeof(long));

        // Custom
        Console.WriteLine("The size of Bool1 is {0}.", sizeof(Bool1));
        Console.WriteLine("The size of Bool2 is {0}.", sizeof(Bool2));
        Console.WriteLine("The size of Bool1Int1Bool1 is {0}.", sizeof(Bool1Int1Bool1));
        Console.WriteLine("The size of Bool2Int1 is {0}.", sizeof(Bool2Int1));
        Console.WriteLine("The size of Bool1Long1 is {0}.", sizeof(Bool1Long1));
        Console.WriteLine("The size of Bool1DateTime1 is {0}.", sizeof(Bool1DateTime1));

        Console.Read();
    }
}

public struct Bool1
{
    private bool b1;
}

public struct Bool2
{
    private bool b1;
    private bool b2;
}

public struct Bool1Int1Bool1
{
    private bool b1;
    private int i1;
    private bool b2;
}

public struct Bool2Int1
{
    private bool b1;
    private bool b2;
    private int i1;
}

public struct Bool1Long1
{
    private bool b1;
    private long l1;
}

public struct Bool1DateTime1
{
    private bool b1;
    private DateTime dt1;
}

that gives the following output:

sizeof result

It seems that the order in which the fields are declared plays a role in the size of the structure.

I was expecting that Bool1Int1Bool1 returns a size of 6 (1 + 4 + 1) but it gives 12 instead (I suppose 4 + 4 + 4??) ! So it seems that the compiler is aligning the members by packing everyting by 4 bytes.

Does it change something if I'm on a 32 bits or 64 bits system?

And second question, for the test with the long type, the bool is packed by 8 bytes this time. Who can explain this?

share|improve this question
5  
You might want to take a look here –  Patryk Ćwiek Jun 4 '13 at 21:06
    
possible duplicate of struct sizeof result not expected –  Michael Burr Jun 5 '13 at 6:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That's because the compiler aligns members so their access speed is optimized, not their memory footprint.

You can add

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack=1)]

before the structure definition and it should align in 1 byte spaces.

share|improve this answer

That's because the compiler aligns member variables of the structs to allow CPU read and write their values quickly.

Here, as you observed, it adds 3 dummy bytes after each bool.

share|improve this answer
1  
why didn't it align them for Bool2Int1? –  Dmitry Khryukin Jun 4 '13 at 21:49
    
@DmitryKhryukin. Basically it aligns variables based on their size. bool's are one byte so they are aligned on a one byte boundary, int's are four bytes, so they are aligned on four byte boundaries. So for Bool2Int, 'b1' is at offset 0, b2 is at offset 1, and i1 is at offset 4. –  shf301 Jun 5 '13 at 3:01
    
what is the difference with Bool1Int1Bool1? I don't see it in your answer. –  Dmitry Khryukin Jun 5 '13 at 3:38
    
@DmitryKhryukin. The compiler observes that the biggest member variable type is int - 4 bytes, so it tries to put everything in chunks of 4 bytes. In Bool2Int1 it can pack 2 first bools in 4 bytes, in Bool1Int1Bool1 they are separated by int, so it has to align them both. –  Marcin Jedynak Jun 5 '13 at 14:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.