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What is an abstract data type in object oriented programming? I've gone through wiki, but I didn't get cleared. Please make me clear.

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33  
memset(sevugarajan, 0, sizeof(sevugarajan)); Ok, you're clear. –  Artelius Nov 7 '09 at 12:59
    
ADT break encapsulation and hence do not exist in OOP. What is a Vulcan in Star Wars? –  Pete Kirkham May 23 '10 at 10:15
    
possible duplicate of characteristics of the abstract class –  this. __curious_geek May 27 '10 at 8:27

12 Answers 12

An abstract class is a generalization concept. It is a class you invent to only use as a base class for inheritance but not to instantiate objects from.

And abstract datatype is not necessarily an OOP concept. It is an older term to describe the concepts of for example Stack and Queue in terms of their functionality, without describing the implementation.

Since you are probably interested in abstract class, a small example:

Suppose you have to make a program to deal with cars and motorbikes. You can define the classes (entities) of Car and Bike and you will see they have much (but not all) functionality in common. It would be a mistake to derive Car from Bike or the other way around. What you need to do is to define a common abstract base-class MotorVehicle and derive both Car and Bike from that class.

abstract class MotorVehicle { ... }
/*concrete*/ class Car : MotorVehicle { ... }
/*concrete*/ class Bike : MotorVehicle { ... }

Note that you would never want to create an object of class MotorVehicle, it would not be 'concrete' (complete). MotorVehicle is only used to build a correct object-model.

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4  
The first few answers simply discussed the abstract keyword of java, which doesn't define a data type per se. Looking up "abstract data type" I got en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abstract_data_type. Henk identifies both of these concepts. It is not obvious that the OP's question is well posed. –  Ewan Todd Nov 7 '09 at 13:17

There is a difference between an "abstract data type" and an "abstract class".

An abstract class is one that may not have definitions for all the methods it defines. You therefore cannot directly instantiate an abstract class. You have to create a subclass and then instantiate that.

An abstract data type is a model of a certain kind of data structure e.g. a Stack. A Stack has push() and pop() operations and that have well-defined behaviour.

The abstract data type (ADT) itself refers to this model, not any particular implementation in any particular programming language or paradigm. You could implement a Stack in an object-oriented language, but you could also implement it in a functional programming language.

ADTs allow discussion about the properties of Stacks, Queues etc that hold for all correct implementations of the ADT.

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didn't understood the third point very much; more confused with this quote "The abstract data type (ADT) itself refers to this model, not any particular implementation in any particular programming language or paradigm" –  sunny Oct 31 '13 at 13:04

Well, it's all about abstraction. Abstraction is particularly useful in programming. The main advantage is ability to hide realization details. You hide it inside one modules (so-called "server modules") and provide some public interface for other modules (so-called "client modules"). And now we have three different possibilities:

Server module can supply an abstract data structure (ADS) itself.

In that case it contains ADS entity itself. The public interface consists of some procedures (and maybe some constants).

Interface of server module (stack_ads.h):

#ifndef STACK_ADS
#define STACK_ADS

const int capacity = 10;

void clear();
int size();
int pop();
void push(int value);

#endif STACK_ADS

Implementation (stack_ads.cpp):

#include "stack_ads.h"

int items[capacity];
int top = -1;

void clear()
{
  top = -1;
}

int size()
{
  return top + 1;
}

int pop()
{
  top -= 1;
  return items[top + 1];
}

void push(int value)
{
  top += 1;
  items[top] = value;
}

In the client module (main.cpp) we import server module and use data structure directly.

#include <iostream>
#include "stack_ads.h"

int main (int argc, char* const argv[]) 
{
  push(1);
  push(2);
  push(3);

  std::cout << pop() << std::endl;
  std::cout << pop() << std::endl;
  std::cout << pop() << std::endl;

  return 0;
}

Server module can supply an abstract data type (ADT) in the form of struct/record.

In client module we can declare variables to be of that type. Because a module is free to declare more than one variable to be of the exported type, it can have more than one data structure. Each abstract data structure is variable of abstract data type.

Interface (stack_adt.h):

#ifndef STACK_ADT
#define STACK_ADT

const int capacity = 10;

typedef struct
{
  int items[capacity];
  int top;
} StackADT;

void clear(StackADT* stack);
int size(StackADT* stack);
int pop(StackADT* stack);
void push(StackADT* stack, int value);  

#endif STACK_ADT

Implementation (stack_adt.cpp):

#include "stack_adt.h"

void clear(StackADT* stack)
{
  stack->top = -1;
}

int size(StackADT* stack)
{
  return stack->top + 1;
}

int pop(StackADT* stack)
{
  stack->top -= 1;
  return stack->items[stack->top + 1];
}

void push(StackADT* stack, int value)
{
  stack->top += 1;
  stack->items[stack->top] = value;
}

Client module:

#include <iostream>
#include "stack_adt.h"

int main (int argc, char* const argv[]) 
{
  StackADT stack1;
  StackADT stack2;
  stack1.top = -1;
  stack2.top = -1;

  push(&stack1, 1);
  push(&stack1, 2);
  push(&stack1, 3);

  std::cout << pop(&stack1) << std::endl;
  std::cout << pop(&stack1) << std::endl;
  std::cout << pop(&stack1) << std::endl;

  push(&stack2, 10);
  push(&stack2, 20);
  push(&stack2, 30);

  std::cout << pop(&stack2) << std::endl;
  std::cout << pop(&stack2) << std::endl;
  std::cout << pop(&stack2) << std::endl;

  return 0;
}

Finally the server module can supply an abstract data type (ADT) in the form of class.

If our language support OOP we can describe ADT by means of classes. And once again in client module we can declare variables to be of that type. In object-oriented terminology, the type is called a class, and the variable with that type is called an object.

Server module interface (Stack.h):

#ifndef STACK
#define STACK

const int capacity = 10;

class Stack
{
public:
  Stack();
  void clear();
  int size();
  int pop();
  void push(int value);
private:
  int items[capacity];
  int top;
};

#endif STACK

Implementation (Stack.cpp):

#include "Stack.h"

Stack::Stack()
{
  this->top = -1;
}

void Stack::clear()
{
  this->top = -1;
}

int Stack::size()
{
  return this->top + 1;
}

int Stack::pop()
{
  this->top -= 1;
  return this->items[this->top + 1];
}

void Stack::push(int value)
{
  this->top += 1;
  this->items[this->top] = value;
}

The differences between two last options are:

  • Terminological mentioned above (type <-> class, variable <-> object).
  • In the non-class ADT, the formal parameter list of every procedure must include a variable s of type Stack. In the stack class, the specification of the data structure s is not included with the other formal parameters following the name of the procedure, but stands alone enclosed in parentheses before the name of the procedure. Using Smalltalk terminology formal parameter before the procedure name is called the receiver.
  • The location of the procedures. In the non-class ADT, the procedures are located outside the Stack struct. In the class, the procedures are located within the class. In object-oriented terminology, procedures that have receivers, and are therefore contained within a class type, are called methods.

Client code:

#include <iostream>
#include "stack.h"

int main (int argc, char* const argv[]) 
{
  Stack stack1;
  Stack stack2;

  stack1.push(1);
  stack1.push(2);
  stack1.push(3);

  std::cout << stack1.pop() << std::endl;
  std::cout << stack1.pop() << std::endl;
  std::cout << stack1.pop() << std::endl;

  stack2.push(10);
  stack2.push(20);
  stack2.push(30);

  std::cout << stack2.pop() << std::endl;
  std::cout << stack2.pop() << std::endl;
  std::cout << stack2.pop() << std::endl;

  return 0;
}
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An Abstract Data Type (ADT) is a mathematical model of a type of data. It describes operations that can be performed on the data and the mathematical definition of those operations using equations.

For example, you can model the behaviour of a stack of numbers, perfectly abstractly using operations such as pop(), push(), top() and maybe a constant symbol representing the empty stack.

For example here are some equations that could form part of the definition of a stack of numbers:

pop(empty) = empty  // silently ignores popping an empty stack
pop(push(N,S)) = S  // i.e. pop removes the top element of push(N,S)
top(push(N,S)) = N  // return topmost element of the stack without changing the stack

An abstract data type isn't at all the same thing as a class in an object model - although they bare some similarities.

Here are the names of the important concepts: initial algebra semantics, isomorphism, quotients, congruences

The point of an abstract data type is to understand the behaviour of a whole class of equivalent type representations using equations and some fancy mathematics that demonstrates that each implementation is "isomorphic" - i.e. that both implementations are exactly equivalent as far as the observable behaviour is concerned.

The wikipedia entry on this is pretty good: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abstract%5Fdata%5Ftype

Here are some good (but very theoretical) course notes that pin down what an ADT is http://www-compsci.swan.ac.uk/~csulrich/ftp/adt/adt.pdf

Although superficially similar to the concept of a "class" in some object-oriented programming languages, a "class" is not an ADT, but a class can be used to implement a specific ADT.

In general the ADT concept is probably more applicable to functional programming than object-oriented programming because not all object-oriented programming languages have classes and ADT-style thinking produces less effective OO designs.

  • Here's a paper that demonstrates the problems of thinking in terms of ADTs in an OO language: http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=74885
  • Basically the paper shows that the "class" that you use to implement an ADT ends up covered with lots of tiny little methods (that look like the basis of ADT equations) rather than having a few powerful, high-abstraction methods.
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In the school they taught me that an ADT is just a group which contains a collection of data, and a set of operations that can be taken over this data. It just refers to the idea, and is not related with any ,language, implementation neither paradigm.

Updated:
so re-reading the question, and accordingly to mi definition, an abstract data type in OOP should be a class abstraction, inherited or not, because it contains data (properties, fields, etc) and operations (methods).

regards

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  1. classes uses the concept of data abstraction , known as absract data type .

  2. abstract data type is an older term to describe the concepts of stack and queues in terms of their functionality without describing their implementation .

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thanks vaibhav jain . this definition help me a lot . i think its the correct definition –  vaibhav jain May 27 '10 at 8:11

Shortly: abstract means that you can't make objects from the defined class. ex: if you have shape,square and rectangle classes, but you don't want to define any objects from shape so you will mark it as abstract...

after that if the user try to define a new object from shape, he will got compiler error..

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I had the same problem until last week.

An abstract class is something that is common or something in general. You can use that class to mould it and extend it in anyway you like.

I can give you a practical example here

Take a class called animal. And it contains functions like eat, sound, move which is general that all animals do. You can extend that class to get specific like cats, dogs etc.

eg.

abstract class animal {

    abstract protected function eat();
    abstract protected function sound();		

}

class dogs extends animal
{
   protected function eat() {
       return "meat";
   }

   public function sound() {
       return "bow wow";
   }
}

hope my answer made sense to you

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This is from Code Complete -Quote: Abstract data types form the foundation for the concept of classes. In lanuages that support classes, you can implement each abstract data type in its own class. Classes usually involve the additional concepts of inheritance and polymorphism. One way of thinking of a class is as an abstract data type plus inheritance and polymorphism.

So in my opinion, Abstract data type in OO means abstract class.

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Take one step back from the code:

What does abstract mean? Abstract

The gist of it is "not real, but capturing a property of real things"

You need to know this for OOP because you will be designing object universes, which requires you to think about how those objects are related.

Abstraction allows you to group some of those objects, thus organizing

1) Your thinking process 2) Your code

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An abstract class does not form a concrete object in the real world unlike pure implementation classes. Abstract as the name suggestes they hold/define common behaviours of related objects that need to be reused/defined independantly in all related objects.

Take an example of Birds. If you are writing a progrm that will have something to do with the birds, then you'll first have an abstract base class as Bird and each bird deriving from the abstract base class Bird. Do note that abstract class BIRD does not represent a concrete real world object but a type of related objects that is birds!

Lets start with the class-diagram and then some code.

alt text

public abstract class Bird
{
    protected string Name = string.Empty;
    public Bird(string name)
    {
        this.Name = name;
    }

    public virtual void Fly()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0} is flying.", this.Name));
    }

    public virtual void Run()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0} cannot run.", this.Name));
    }
}

public class Parrot : Bird
{
    public Parrot() : base("parrot") { }
}

public class Sparrow : Bird
{
    public Sparrow() : base("sparrow") { }
}

public class Penguin : Bird
{
    public Penguin() : base("penguin") { }

    public override void Fly()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0} cannot fly. Some birds do not fly.", this.Name));
    }

    public override void Run()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0} is running. Some birds do run.", this.Name));
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        Parrot p = new Parrot();
        Sparrow s = new Sparrow();
        Penguin pe = new Penguin();

        List<Bird> birds = new List<Bird>();

        birds.Add(p);
        birds.Add(s);
        birds.Add(pe);

        foreach (Bird bird in birds)
        {
            bird.Fly();
            bird.Run();
        }

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
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Abstract type means whose objects does not exist in real world since it does not have physical entity.

It acts as a base class for concrete class which has physical existance.

e.g.

 Shape is an abstract class whereas circle,rectangle are concrete classes.
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2  
You're getting Abstract Data Type and Abstract Base Class confused here. Abstract Data Type and Abstract Base Class don't abstract the same things. In an Abstract Data Type it means that you're abstracting away from the implmentation of a concrete thing, but in Abstract Base Class it means you've only modelled a generic part of a set of related things. –  daf Nov 7 '09 at 15:02

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