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Professional JavaScript for Web Developers, Third Edition by Nicholas C. Zakas (Wrox, 2012, p.210-215 describes "Parasitic Combination Inheritance" using the following function:

function inheritPrototype(subType, superType) {
    var prototype = object(superType.prototype); 
    prototype.constructor = subType; 
    subType.prototype = prototype; 
}

I have yet to figure out what the assignment of subType to the prototype.constructor does or is supposed to do. Unless I am missing something, the output I get using the example code is the same:

Without "augment object" (prototype.constructor = subType;) in inheritPrototype: http://jsfiddle.net/Q22DN/

With "augment object" (prototype.constructor = subType;) in inheritPrototype http://jsfiddle.net/eAYN8/

Can this really be a line of purposeless code? Thank you for your explanation!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The assignment to "constructor" is not mandatory as the assignment to "prototype" is. The reason to do it is that function prototypes usually come with the "constructor" property set by default. It might be useful for libraries that copy objects since you can get a reference to that object's constructor from the object itself.

function Foo(){
}

obj = new Foo();

console.log(obj.constructor); //function Foo
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is there any reason to prefer this pattern to goog.inherits? docs.closure-library.googlecode.com/git/… I like how it sets the superClass_ in child so you can override parent methods and still call them from a child. –  HMR Jun 5 '13 at 0:40
    
@HMR: Different inheritance patterns tend to work better with different features (how you interact with "regular" classes, if you can handle multiple inheritance, private or protected variables, super, etc). Personally, I tend to program in a more "functional" style so I don't actually use that many classes and when I do use them the hierarchy is usually very flat so superclass and inheritance stuff doesn't end up mattering much. –  hugomg Jun 5 '13 at 3:19
    
Both missingno and Givi are correct in that the assignment to constructor is not mandatory and without it the subType (or child) instance constructor === SuperType, and resetting it to SubType will make that information available later. Perhaps that is all there is to it. Thanks! –  Kevin Swallow Jun 6 '13 at 0:52
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Demo You overwrite constructor prototype so you lose SubType.prototype.constructor and if you want later to know object constructor you ought to explicitly set it...

function object(o){
    function F(){}
    F.prototype = o;
    return new F();
}

function inheritPrototype(subType, superType) {
    var prototype = object(superType.prototype); 
    prototype.constructor = subType; //if omit (new SubType()).constructor === superType 
    subType.prototype = prototype; 
}

function SuperType(name){
    this.name = name;
}

function SubType(name, age){
    SuperType.call(this, name);
    this.age = age;
}

inheritPrototype(subType, superType);
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You need to set the child's constructor because the child's constructor property gets overwritten when using Object(.create):

function inheritPrototype(subType, superType) {
    var prototype = Object(superType.prototype); 
    prototype.constructor = subType; 
    subType.prototype = prototype; 
}
var Parent=function(){
 console.log("parent constructor called");
 this.name="parent";
}
var Child=function(){
 console.log("child constructor called");
}
inheritPrototype(Child,Parent);

var c= new Child();
console.log(c);//Object { constructor=function()}
c.constructor();//child constructor called

Without:

    function inheritPrototype(subType, superType) {
        var prototype = Object(superType.prototype); 
//        prototype.constructor = subType; 
        subType.prototype = prototype; 
    }
    var Parent=function(){
     console.log("parent constructor called");
     this.name="parent";
    }
    var Child=function(){
     console.log("child constructor called");
    }
    inheritPrototype(Child,Parent);

    var c= new Child();
    console.log(c);//Object { }
    c.constructor();//parent constructor called
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