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I can't seem to find more than one error that would cause an infinite loop within this code. Any help anyone could provide me with in finding these errors would be greatly appreciated. Thank you all very much.

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <cmath>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

void Increment(int);
int main ()
{
    int count = 1;
    while (count < 10)
    cout << " The Number After " << count; 
    Increment(count);
    cout << " is "<< count << endl;
    return 0;

}

void Increment (int nextNumber)
{
    nextNumber++;
}
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closed as too localized by Oliver Charlesworth, patros, Ernest Friedman-Hill, Nik Bougalis, Mooing Duck Jun 5 '13 at 0:51

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2  
What error did you find? –  Nik Bougalis Jun 5 '13 at 0:41
    
the lack of braces for pertaining to the while loop. That is the only one that I can find as of now. –  user2453846 Jun 5 '13 at 0:43
1  
so perhaps you should fix that first, and run the program and see what you get? –  Nik Bougalis Jun 5 '13 at 0:44
    
I can only find two. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Jun 5 '13 at 0:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <cmath>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

void Increment(int);

int main ()
{
    int count = 1;
    while (count < 10)

First mistake is here - You forgot the braces { } (which makes multiple statements be treated as one statement). This means that the while loop contains only the very next line (the next single statement).

    cout << " The Number After " << count; 

So this line is executed, then it goes to the while body, sees that the condition is true and executed this line... Until the end of time.

    Increment(count);

Second mistake is here:

void Increment (int nextNumber)
{
    nextNumber++;
}

The increment is done on a local copy of nextNumber, e.g. nextNumber has been passed by value. Some solutions are

1) Return the incremented version of the number, and use the return. (If you do this, be careful, because typing return nextNumber++ will return the original value, but return ++nextNumber will return the next value - read about pre-increment and post-increment)

2) Pass a pointer to Increment, and edit the original integer via dereferencing the pointer.

3) Pass a reference to Increment, then when you edit the integer it is edited by reference and the original copy changes too.

(And of course, if you make it not a function it works fine too)

    cout << " is "<< count << endl;
    return 0;

}

I don't see a third error.

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1  
Or (3) make Increment accept a reference: void Increment(int &nextNumber). –  Nik Bougalis Jun 5 '13 at 0:47
    
@NikBougalis That is a good solution. –  Patashu Jun 5 '13 at 0:49
    
Thank you very much for the clear and concise help Patashu. I'm certain there are three errors, but I will continue to try and find the third and final one on my own. –  user2453846 Jun 5 '13 at 0:49
    
Thank you as well Nik! –  user2453846 Jun 5 '13 at 0:50
2  
@user2453846 It's possible that whoever set the challenge considered the Increment function to be two different errors. If you fix everything you can see and then it starts working, that's how you'll know ;) –  Patashu Jun 5 '13 at 0:50
while (count < 10)
    cout << " The Number After " << count; 
    Increment(count);
    cout << " is "<< count << endl;

This is how the line is functionally parsed:

while (count < 10)
    cout << " The Number After " << count; 
Increment(count);
cout << " is "<< count << endl;

That is, only the first print statement is being run. And since there is no loop terminator on that line, an infinite loop is encountered. I recommend to avoid confusion that you use blocks where you can:

while (count < 10)
{
    cout << " The Number After " << count; 
    Increment(count);
    cout << " is "<< count << endl;
}

The other problem is that Increment only operates on a copy of the argument. Use a reference so that the we can use an alias for the argument:

void Increment(int& nextNumber)
{
    nextNumber++;
}
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Increment also won't work –  aaronman Jun 5 '13 at 0:43
    
@aaronman See my edit –  0x499602D2 Jun 5 '13 at 0:45
1  
+1 for your clever username (and the helpful answer) –  John Jun 5 '13 at 0:47
    
Thank you all for the quick and constructive help. Very much appreciated. –  user2453846 Jun 5 '13 at 0:53

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