Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a code and i wonder can JIT be prevented from optimising method clearArraySafely? Is it possible to selectively disabling the JIT for some part of code?

Or how can I be sure that this code will not be optimized?

private static char[] password;

public static void clearArraySafely() {
    // Overwritting array
    for (int i = 0 ; i <= password.length; i++) {
       password[i] = 0;
       //System.out.print(i); // <- I don't want to do this trick to be sure
    }
    password = null;
}

Is there any good class to store password insted of char array?

share|improve this question
    
How would disabling optimization prevent someone from putting in System.out.print or otherwise capturing the data (i.e. with an attached debugger) ..? It seems like the question is boxing itself into a corner. –  user2246674 Jun 5 '13 at 0:53
3  
It looks like you're trying to prevent against some sort of attack. Unless you're sure this is actually sufficient protection, you're just wasting your time. If the enemy can read the contents of the JVM's memory, even with no GC retaining paths, isn't it pretty much game over anyway? –  Matt Ball Jun 5 '13 at 0:59
    
password, either in plain text or of hashed value, are just strings to Java. Dont worry about protecting a string from malicious users. Worry about some "global" means necessary such as firewall etc... –  Michael Mao Jun 5 '13 at 1:13
    
Matt Ball@ you are right what exacly im preventing and i think u are right - im too much paranoid, on one hand im thinking how it is possible to hack it and in the same time how it is possible to secure no matter what. –  dawciobiel Jun 5 '13 at 1:46
    
i wonder: can this be optimized? I mean, there is actual semantic to it, an object is mutated - will the JIT even optimize that (away - i guess that's your trouble) just because the object won't be available AFTER the method is called? Does the JIT have to assume the reference could still be used somewhere? Also, why do you store the password in the first place? –  kutschkem Jun 5 '13 at 9:23

1 Answer 1

There are two answers to this Question:

  1. AFAIK, there is no way of "turning off" optimization for a method without turning it off for everything.

  2. You can do things that are likely to inhibit the particular optimization you are worried about for current generation Java compilers. For instance:

        private static char[] password;
        public static String dummy;
    
        public static void clearArraySafely() {
            // Overwritting array
            for (int i = 0 ; i <= password.length; i++) {
               password[i] = 0;
            }
            dummy = new String(password);
            password = null;
        }
    

    The JIT compiler cannot optimize away the zero assignments. If it did, then the dummy String would be created with the "wrong" contents. And since dummy can be accessed by reflection without breaking any JLS rules, the JIT can't apply escape analysis to avoid creating it.

    Note however, that there is always the possibility of some future generation JIT compiler being ... cleverer. If you want to avoid that, you'd need to make sure that dummy affects the program's output in some way; e.g. by printing it.

Is there any good class to store password insted of char array?

AFAIK, none that won't suffer from the same problems.


Having said that, going to this level to protect a password is (IMO) bordering on paranoia. If someone has the level of access required to steal a password out of unreachable objects in the heap, they can most likely get the password other ways; e.g. by intercepting the characters at the OS level, or by "debugging" your JVM.


My paranoia is associated with the debug JVM.

Well unfortunately, your paranoia won't help.

For instance, the schemes you designed to prevent someone attaching a debugger can be defeated by reverse engineering and then modifying the exe file. And so can any other schemes you devised.

If a user controls the platform on which your program is executed, it is not possible stop him/her from "debugging" the running program. The only way to prevent it is to only run the application on a platform that you control.

(BTW - this is not a Java specific problem. It applies to all programming languages. Some are easier to "hack" than others, but they can all be hacked if the unscrupulous user is skilled and motivated, and has the time to develop the "hack".)

share|improve this answer
    
My paranoia is associated with the debug JVM. Therefore, the resulting packed application JAR file to an EXE file and I set the JVM parameter "-XX: + DisableAttachMechanism" and "-Dcom.ibm.tools.attach.enable = false". –  dawciobiel Jun 16 '13 at 9:24
    
Now in my mind is to create a system of checksum for the JAR file and check it when the application starts. In the case of a JAR file will not be a problem, rather, while I still think about how to do this for a form of EXE file (self-checking-JAR + small EXE launcher for it?). The worst thing is that I am not at all convinced that this type of checksum, it should ensure that the file will not be modified by third parties. –  dawciobiel Jun 16 '13 at 9:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.