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I have no idea what is happening here. The code is:

  if( true ) { 

      console.log('In first function definition');

      function test(){
        console.log('Hello world');
      }

    } else {

      console.log('In the second function definition');

      function test(){
        console.log('Goodbye world');
      }

    }

  test();

I would expect this to log in the console:

'In the first function definition'
'Hello world'

But instead it logs:

'In the first function definition'
'Goodbye world'

How is the second named function being created when the code doesn't enter that branch?

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why do you want to re-define same function name? –  Raptor Jun 5 '13 at 2:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Remember, everything in JavaScript is function-scoped; there is no block scope.

To that effect, you have two function declarations defined in the same scope (whatever the scope that if-else sits in), with the same name, in different blocks. This produces inconsistent results between browsers.

You need to either give those functions different names, or use function expressions, with something like this:

var f;
if(true) { 
   console.log('In first function definition');

   f = function(){
     console.log('Hello world');
   };

} else {
  console.log('In the second function definition');

  f = function(){
    console.log('Goodbye world');
  };
}
f();

To your excellent question of

But how is the function defined, if we don't enter that branch of the code? If that block is not executed, why is scope a consideration?

The simple answer is that function declarations are "hoisted", and immediately available anywhere in the scope, even before the declaration itself.

ie:

function foo(){
    f(); //perfectly valid

    function f(){
    }
}

The longer answer is that, prior to entering the scope, all variable declarations, and function declarations are stripped out, and placed onto the "activation object." The activation object is then placed at the head of the "scope chain." When you execute the function, any references to these variables and functions are simply resolved from there.

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But how is the function defined, if we don't enter that branch of the code? If that block is not executed, why is scope a consideration? –  BIOS Jun 5 '13 at 2:59
    
But they're supposed to be function expressions, not function definitions. The JS engine is getting it wrong. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jun 5 '13 at 2:59
2  
+1 — function expressions are the key to consistent results. Some browsers allow conditional declarations (e.g. Firefox) but others don't (e.g. IE). Using expressions provides consistent results. –  RobG Jun 5 '13 at 3:05
2  
@AdamRackis: " so the spec has a properly defined behavior for multiple function declarations with the same name in the same scope?" Yes: When there are multiple declarations in the same scope, the last one wins; Section 10.5 makes this clear. But the declarations above are invalid because they're in conditional blocks, which is not allowed. Section 12 even specifically calls this out. Some engines tolerate them, but they are not consistent with each other (or even earlier versions of themselves). –  T.J. Crowder Jun 5 '13 at 9:04
1  
@RobG: Right, but that treatment is Firefox-specific and invalid according to the specification. It's not consistent across engines, or even within versions of Firfox's SpiderMonkey engine, which at one stage rejected them, and at other stages rewrote them (effectively) as function expressions (your "function statement" treatment). So until/unless ESx defines a function statement, best not to rely on the behavior. –  T.J. Crowder Jun 5 '13 at 9:06

Function definitions in javascript are independent of control structures, meaning that when you redefine the function the second time even though it's in a branch of a control structure that will never bit hit it still redefines the function. What are you trying to do anyway?

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That's not how it works in practice. Firefox allows conditional function declarations. –  RobG Jun 5 '13 at 3:03
    
@RobG: It is with some engines, such as Chrome's V8. Or indeed, anything strictly following the specification. –  T.J. Crowder Jun 5 '13 at 10:05

Some JavaScript engines treat the definition as always occurring regardless of the condition, and the second definition overwrites the first.

Note: Some JavaScript engines, not including SpiderMonkey, incorrectly treat any function expression with a name as a function definition.

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Thanks for the link. Good to see more info on it with regard to it being vendor conditional. –  BIOS Jun 5 '13 at 3:13

To add to Adam's answer, you can get a way around it if you assign your function.

if( true ) { 
  console.log('In first function definition');
  test = function() { console.log('Hello world'); }
} else {
  console.log('In the second function definition');
  test = function(){ console.log('Goodbye world'); }
}
test();

This will print

In the first function definition
Hello world

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Thanks. I'm defining the functions conditionally like this now :) –  BIOS Jun 5 '13 at 3:18
    
@BIOS: FWIW, Ashwin's expressions are missing semicolons at the end. The horror that is "Automatic Semicolon Insertion" will add them if the code is formatted as above, but it's not something I recommend relying on. –  T.J. Crowder Jun 5 '13 at 17:14
    
Hey yeah i just meant i was creating functions by assigning anonymous functions to variables now, not using this code but thanks :) –  BIOS Jun 5 '13 at 18:35

According to ECMA-262, function declarations are processed before any code is executed. So declaring functions anywhere effectively moves ("hoists") them to the top of the execution context.

However, not everything that looks like a declaration is a declaration. In the following:

if (false) {
  function fred() {return true;}
}

Some browsers see a function declaration so:

alert(fred());

shows "true". Other browsers use an extension to ECMA-262 that allows it to be treated as a named function expression function statement (I'll try to find a reference to an excellent posting by Richard Cornford on comp.lang.javascript about that see below), so that:

alert(fred());

throws as an error that fred is undefined. Try it in Firefox and IE.

So the bottom line is if you want to conditionally create a function, use an unambiguous function expression. They're often used in conjunction with feature testing, e.g. to create a function to get the textContent or innerText of an element:

var getText = (function() {
  var el = document.createElement('div');

  if (typeof div.textContent == 'string') { 
    div = null;
    return function(el) {return el.textContent;};

  } else if (typeof div.innerText == 'string') { 
    div = null;
    return function(el) {return el.innerText;};
  }
}());

Edit

Here's Richard Cornford's post in FunctionExpression's and memory consumptions. The important part:

In fact it is a function statement; a syntax extension that is capable of allowing the conditional creation of a function because being a Statement it can be evaluative inside a block.

But the whole post is worth reading.

Also note that function statements are warned against in ES5 strict mode and may be introduced in some future version of ECMAScript.

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