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I have a method that takes a block as an argument. That block needs to be augmented and then passed to a library function that block as an argument. An example:

typedef void (^eblock_t)(void);

void libraryFunction(eblock_t block);

- (void)myMethod:(eblock_t)block {
    libraryFunction ( ^{
        block();
        NSLog(@"block executed");  // This is the augmentation of the block
    } );
}

That example is pretty straight forward and works for straight forward situations. I evolved that example a bit to the following using GHUnit. It is a bit contrived, but works to illustrate my problem as concisely as possible:


EBlock.h

typedef void (^eblock_t)(void);

@interface EBlock : NSObject {
    eblock_t _block;
}

@property (nonatomic, readwrite, strong) eblock_t blockOption1;
@property (nonatomic, readwrite, strong) eblock_t blockOption2;

- (void)chooseBlock:(NSUInteger)option;
- (void)executeBlock;

@end

EBlock.m

#import "EBlock.h"

@implementation EBlock

- (void)chooseBlock:(NSUInteger)option {
    if (1 == option) {
        // This is a block wrapping a block to augment the block
        // This is the source of problem with test_switchOption_1For2
        _block = ^{
            self.blockOption1();
            NSLog(@"option1");  // This is the augmentation 
        };
    } else {
        // There is no block wrapping the block and thus no augmentation of the block
        // There is no issue with test_switchOption_2For1
        _block = self.blockOption2;
    }
}

- (void)executeBlock { _block(); }

@end

Test_EBlock.h

@class EBlock;

@interface Test_EBlock : GHTestCase

@property (nonatomic, readonly) NSUInteger counter1;
@property (nonatomic, readonly) NSUInteger counter2;

- (void)incrementCounter1;
- (void)incrementCounter2;

@end

Test_EBlock.m

#import "Test_EBlock.h"
#import "EBlock.h"

@implementation Test_EBlock

- (void)incrementCounter1 { _counter1++; }

- (void)incrementCounter2 { _counter2++; }

- (void)setUp {
    [super setUp];
    _counter1 = _counter2 = 0u;
}

- (void)tearDown { [super tearDown]; }

- (void)test_option1 {
    EBlock *foo = [[EBlock alloc] init];
    foo.blockOption1 = ^{ [self incrementCounter1]; };
    foo.blockOption2 = ^{ [self incrementCounter2]; };
    [foo chooseBlock:1];

    [foo executeBlock];
    GHAssertEquals(self.counter1, 1u, nil);
    GHAssertEquals(self.counter2, 0u, nil);
}

- (void)test_option2 {
    EBlock *foo = [[EBlock alloc] init];
    foo.blockOption1 = ^{ [self incrementCounter1]; };
    foo.blockOption2 = ^{ [self incrementCounter2]; };
    [foo chooseBlock:2];

    [foo executeBlock];
    GHAssertEquals(self.counter1, 0u, nil);
    GHAssertEquals(self.counter2, 1u, nil);
}

- (void)test_switchOption_1For2 {
    EBlock *foo = [[EBlock alloc] init];
    foo.blockOption1 = ^{ [self incrementCounter1]; };
    foo.blockOption2 = ^{ [self incrementCounter2]; };
    [foo chooseBlock:1];

    // switch what is done in the block
    foo.blockOption1 = ^{ [self incrementCounter2]; };

    [foo executeBlock];
    GHAssertEquals(self.counter1, 1u, nil);  // This fails 
    GHAssertEquals(self.counter2, 0u, nil);  // This fails
}

- (void)test_switchOption_2For1 {
    EBlock *foo = [[EBlock alloc] init];
    foo.blockOption1 = ^{ [self incrementCounter1]; };
    foo.blockOption2 = ^{ [self incrementCounter2]; };
    [foo chooseBlock:2];

    // switch what is done in the block
    foo.blockOption2 = ^{ [self incrementCounter1]; };

    [foo executeBlock];
    GHAssertEquals(self.counter1, 0u, nil);
    GHAssertEquals(self.counter2, 1u, nil);
}

Discussion

Test: test_option1, test_option2, & test_switchOption_2For1 pass.

test_switchOption_1For2 fails because of GHAssertEquals(self.counter1, 0u, nil); and GHAssertEquals(self.counter2, 1u, nil);

This is because the block that is being executed self.blockOption1 is actually [self incrementCounter2] and not [self incrementCounter1]. This is because in EBlock.m chooseBlock the block wrapping the block has copied self.blockOption1 which at the time of evaluation is [self incrementCounter2]. Is there a better way to augment the block so the block does not have to be wrapped? Or is there a way not to delay the evaluation of self.blockOption1 so that it is [self incrementCounter1].

share|improve this question
1  
The assertions in your discussion do not match the code. The code is asserting that counter 1 is 1 and counter 2 is 0, which would occur if the block was evaluated when it was chosen. Your discussion asserts that counter 1 is 0 and counter 2 is 1, which would occur if the block was evaluated when it was run. –  ughoavgfhw Jun 5 '13 at 4:04
    
@ughoavgfhw you are correct let me refactor my question. The asserts should be true, they are not. My discussion was wrong (it was late). –  mmorris Jun 5 '13 at 12:48
    
@ughoavgfhw I fixed the discussion section. I had mixed up what I had wanted to happen with what had actually happened. All good now. –  mmorris Jun 5 '13 at 12:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What is captured by your wrapping block is self, not the value of self.blockOption1. If you want to capture the latter, try:

- (void)chooseBlock:(NSUInteger)option {
    if (1 == option) {
       eblock_t local_block = self.blockOption1;
        // This is a block wrapping a block to augment the block
        _block = ^{
            local_block();
            NSLog(@"option1");  // This is the augmentation 
        };
    } else {
        // There is no block wrapping the block and thus no augmentation of the block
        // There is no issue with test_switchOption_2For1
        _block = self.blockOption2;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Finally, I see the forest. Thank You! –  mmorris Jun 6 '13 at 13:19

If I understand you correctly you wish to delay the effect of chooseBlock until executeBlock to that the block can be changed between them. Just rearrange your logic (typed directly into SO, could be tided up):

#import "EBlock.h"

@implementation EBlock
{
   NSUInteger currentChoice;
}

- (void)chooseBlock:(NSUInteger)option
{
   currentChoice = option;
}

- (void)executeBlock
{
    if (1 == option)
    {   // This is a block wrapping a block to augment the block
        // This is the source of problem with test_switchOption_1For2
        _block = ^{
            self.blockOption1();
            NSLog(@"option1");  // This is the augmentation 
        };
    }
    else
    {
        // There is no block wrapping the block and thus no augmentation of the block
        // There is no issue with test_switchOption_2For1
        _block = self.blockOption2;
    }

    _block();
}

@end
share|improve this answer
    
Admittedly, this is contrived example to illustrate the problem that I am having with GCD, without adding the complexity of multiple threads. I agree rearranging the logic solves the issue with the example code, but does not work with GCD. Calling chooseBlock simulates calling from dispatch_source_set_event_handler while executeBlock simulates the thread executing the block. Switching the block via foo.blockOption1 = ^{ [self incrementCounter2]; } simulates calling a second time prior to the block code being executed. –  mmorris Jun 5 '13 at 12:44
    
@mmorris - so the answer is right, it is the question that is wrong... ;-) Unfortunately I think your attempt to simplify the question has failed. Submit a new question, from your comment it sounds like dispatch_source_set_event_handler should do what you want, but presumably it is not. –  CRD Jun 5 '13 at 18:42
    
Believe it or not, I have no issue with GCD. My issue is with the code that I have written that interacts with GCD. Which is what is in the question, simplified by not including GCD. I am looking for a better way to build a block based on a block that is being supplied -or- a way for EBlock chooseBlock self.blockOption1() to be evaluated (partially) so that Test_EBlock's [self incrementCounter1] is in the block that will be evaluated by EBlock executeBlock. That was a mouthful. ;) –  mmorris Jun 5 '13 at 19:30
1  
@mmorris - There isn't a better way to wrap a block in a block - do exactly as you have done, define a block and within it call the other block. You can't pull a block apart and inject code into it. Why is this causing a problem for you? If all you want to do is freeze the value of blockOption1 into the wrapped block then do eblock_t now = self.blockOption1; _block = ^{ now(); ... }. –  CRD Jun 5 '13 at 21:33

You may want to copy the block that came in as a argument/property. Try go with:

@property (copy) eblock_t block;
share|improve this answer
    
Copying ^{ self.blockOption1(); NSLog(@"option1"); }; does not solve the problem as self.blockOption1() is evaluated the same way, [self incrementCounter2], when called by executeBlock as it does as a strong reference. –  mmorris Jun 5 '13 at 21:20
    
What is needed to achieve what I am trying to do is have self.blockOption1() expand/evaluate/??? to Test_EBlock's [self incrementCounter1] –  mmorris Jun 5 '13 at 21:21
    
@mmorris Are you 100% sure that you have retained every block and object involved? Try turn on NSZombie and catch all NSExceptions with lldb. Or maybe you need to catch the -dealloc's. If you are using GCD, maybe you need to use some alternative way to organize your tasks and blocks. –  Maxthon Chan Jun 5 '13 at 21:30

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