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I have a text field from which I am calling a function on onChange event. I am throwing a confirm window here when the value in that textfield is changed. If cancel is clicked( in confirm window), the old value must get set back into the text field. If proceed or ok is clicked, the new value should be retained. I have been trying this for a long time but am unable to retain the old value.

Eg: Before onchange, val in text field ='first'; onChange event, val changed to 'second', confirm window opens, if ok selected text field should have second and if cancel is selected 'first' should be present in the text field.

function onChangeOfValue(input){
    //var oldValue = document.getElementById(input).value;
    document.getElementById(input).onchange = function(){
    var newValue = this.value;
    alert("newVal is--->"+newValue);
    if(document.getElementById(input) != null && document.getElementById(input) != '' 
    && !confirm("Do you want to continue?")){

    // this.input=oldValue;
        return false;
    }
    }

}
share|improve this question
1  
you're looking for defaultValue. –  ericosg Jun 5 '13 at 4:44
    
Looking for the value present in that textfield, before a change is being tried. –  Anuj Balan Jun 5 '13 at 4:47
    
i use defaultValue to store my oldValue –  ericosg Jun 5 '13 at 4:56
    
How to do that ? –  Anuj Balan Jun 5 '13 at 5:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Note that form controls have a defaultValue property that is the default value (surprisingly). You can use this property to store the previous value of the input, or to return the value to the previous value.

So putting together the suggestions you've been given, the following function is passed a reference to the element and asks the user if they want to keep the current value. If they answer yes, then the defaultValue of the input is set to the current value. If the users says no (i.e. cancel), then the value is reset to the defaultValue.

Note that this approach will overwrite the original value of the input, so if you reset the form, the input's value will be reset to the current defaultValue.

<script>
function onChangeOfValue(element) {
  var oldValue = element.defaultValue;
  var newValue = element.value;
  if (window.confirm('do you really want to change the value to ' + newValue + '?')) {
    element.defaultValue = newValue;
  } else {
    element.value = element.defaultValue;
  } 
}
</script>

<input onchange="onChangeOfValue(this);">

This approach will work for any number of inputs in the same page and form.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 from me - not sure who downvoted. Curious though, does defaultValue work in older browsers? I mean, obviously you can always set a property like that in code, but if you do <input defaultValue='foo' /> will foo still show up in the textbox in IE8, and show up as the initial value of element.defaultValue? –  Adam Rackis Jun 5 '13 at 5:29
    
Ahh - I feel silly - defaultValue picks up whatever value you render the input with. Neat. Still not sure if it works in IE8 - I guess jsFiddle doesn't play well with it –  Adam Rackis Jun 5 '13 at 5:34
    
defaultValue worked. Thanks !!!! –  Anuj Balan Jun 5 '13 at 5:53
    
@AdamRackis: This approach worked, so no problems !!! –  Anuj Balan Jun 5 '13 at 5:53
    
The defaultValue property has been around forever, it's very well supported. –  RobG Jun 5 '13 at 8:28

I would use a closure to keep track of the last value:

(function(){ 
    var oldValue = document.getElementById(input).value;
    document.getElementById(input).onchange = function(){
        var newValue = this.value;
        alert("newVal is--->"+newValue);
        if(document.getElementById(input) != null 
            && document.getElementById(input) != '' 
            && !confirm("Do you want to continue?")){

            this.value = oldValue;
            return false;
        } else {
            oldValue = this.value;
        }
    };
})();
share|improve this answer
    
I dont know what closure is(novice to JS). As of now, onChange of that textfield will call a 'onChangeOfValue' function. You want me to add the above code in that ? It will automatically capture the old value ? I doubt that. –  Anuj Balan Jun 5 '13 at 4:47
    
A closure basically means that a function has access to the context that existed when it was invoked. I'm saying replacing your onchange handler with what I have should get you what you want –  Adam Rackis Jun 5 '13 at 4:48
    
Suppose textfield id is 'home', then var oldValue = document.getElementById("home"); will capture the oldValue before change ? –  Anuj Balan Jun 5 '13 at 4:48
    
It should - read the code closely - oldValue is assigned the new value of the input as the last line of the handler, assuming it was not reverted to oldValue –  Adam Rackis Jun 5 '13 at 4:54
    
aaah... It was oldVal="first" initially and thats why I added 2nd comment. ;) It is working now... Thanks for the knowledge & time adam –  Anuj Balan Jun 5 '13 at 5:13

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