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Please explain this block of code:

void main()
{   
    int t,
        a = 5,
        b = 10,
        c = 15;  
    t = (++a && ++b, ++a), ++a || ++c;   // need explanation for this line
    printf("%d  %d  %d %d", t, a, b, c);
}
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2  
I misread the question; I don't think it's a dupe of what I thought it was a dupe of. –  Carl Norum Jun 5 '13 at 5:21
    
please explain this block of code –  kavi Jun 5 '13 at 5:27
2  
Note that there are sequence points enough (at the comma operators, and also at the && and || operators) that the code is not the usual case of undefined behaviour (so it is not a duplicate of the usual 'what is the result of ++i + i++' type of question). –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 5 '13 at 5:28
2  
The return type of main() should be int, not void. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 5 '13 at 5:29
    
+1 @JonathanLeffler, yup. If I could rescind my close vote, I would. Answer below. –  Carl Norum Jun 5 '13 at 5:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The comma operator returns the result of its second operand, and the || operator will short circuit. So what happens in this case is:

  1. ++a is evaluated, a is now 6.

  2. Since the result of (1) was non-zero, the right side of the && is evaluated. That means ++b, so b becomes 11.

  3. (1) and (2) are the left side of a comma operator, so the result of the && is discarded. (it's 1, if that matters to you).

  4. The ++a on the right side of the first , is evaluated. a is now 7.

  5. the assignment to t takes place - t is now 7, the result of the first comma operator.

  6. All of that was the left side of another comma operator, so the result (7) is discarded. Next ++a is evaluated. a is now 8.

  7. Since a is not 0, the || short circuits, and the ++c isn't evaluated. c stays 15.

Results: t is 7, a is 8, b is 11, and c is 15. The printf statement outputs:

7  8  11 15

Overall, this code would be easier to understand if you just wrote:

++a;
++b;
t = ++a;
++a;

Which has precisely the same behaviour.

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2  
+1: the assignment before the second comma operator is the bit that catches people out (me included when I first looked at it). It is precisely why such constructs should be avoided in real code; they are nasty, tricky things to read. Sometimes, there might be grounds for something faintly similar with more complex terms, but...it would likely be hidden in a macro, and would probably be better as an inline function, and still would be unlikely to increment the same variable 3 times. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 5 '13 at 5:45
    
Me too! If I hadn't run it to check my answer, I'd have gotten it wrong myself. In retrospect, I should have known. It's pretty idiomatic to use the comma operator along with assignments in a for loop, for example. –  Carl Norum Jun 5 '13 at 6:29

Execution ->

  t = (++a && ++b, ++a), ++a || ++c;  // () Priority
      ^
  t = (++a && ++b, ++a), ++a || ++c;  // ++a -> a = 6
        ^
  t = ( 6 && ++b, ++a), ++a || ++c;   // ++b -> b = 11
               ^
  t = ( 6 && 11 , ++a), ++a || ++c;   // 6 && 11 -> 1
           ^          
  t = ( 1 , ++a), ++a || ++c;         // ++a -> a = 7
            ^          
  t = ( 1 , 7), ++a || ++c;          // (1,7) -> 7 ... Comma operator has less priority 
          ^          
  t = 7, ++a || ++c;                //  (t = 7), ++a || ++c; ...Assigned value to t... Comma operator has less priority 
    ^
  ++a || ++c;                       // ++a -> a = 8
   ^          
  8 || ++c;                        //  8 || ++c -> 1 ...as 1 || exp -> 1...Logical OR skip next part if 1st exp is true  
    ^

Finally ->

t = 7
a = 8
b = 11
c = 15 
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1  
Cool breakdown! One small tweak, though - the assignment happens before the right side of the second comma operator is evaluated. –  Carl Norum Jun 5 '13 at 5:41
    
@CarlNorum.. You are right, Thanx for that. –  Navnath Jun 5 '13 at 5:53
    
No problem - looks great! –  Carl Norum Jun 5 '13 at 5:55
1  
awesome explanation –  Raghu Srikanth Reddy Jun 5 '13 at 6:23
    
@RaghuSrikanthReddy...Thanx for compliment. –  Navnath Jun 5 '13 at 6:27
int t, a = 5, b = 10, c = 15;

In C (and C++) the comma operator evaluates it's first operand, discards it and evaluates it's second operand and returns it.

++a && ++b is first evaluated, a is now 6, b is now 11.

(++a && ++b, ++a) now the second operand to the right of the comma (++a) is evaluated, a is now 7. Also at this point t is assigned to the value 7. This is because the assignment operator has a higher precedence than the comma operator.

(++a && ++b, ++a), ++anow the second operand to the right of(++a && ++b, ++a)is evaluated. The third++a` gives a's value as 8.

The logical || operator evaluates it's first operand and if it is true it does not evaluate the second operand. The first operand (++a && ++b, ++a), ++a is non-zero (true) and therefore the ++c is not evaluated. c's value remains at 15.

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