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Is there a way to get stored procedures from a SQL 2005 Express database using C#? I would like to export all of this data in the same manner that you can script it our using SQL Management Studio, without having to install the GUI.

I've seen some references to do thing via the PowerShell but in the end a C# console app is what I really want.

To clarify.... I'd like to script out the stored procedures. The list via the Select * from sys.procedures is helpful, but in the end I need to script out each of these.

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11 Answers 11

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Just read the output of SELECT NAME from SYS.PROCEDURES , then call EXEC sp_HelpText SPNAME for each stored procedure, you'll get a record set with one line of text per row.

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You can use SMO for that. First of all, add references to these assemblies to your project:

  • Microsoft.SqlServer.ConnectionInfo
  • Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo
  • Microsoft.SqlServer.SmoEnum

They are located in the GAC (browse to C:\WINDOWS\assembly folder).

Use the following code as an example of scripting stored procedures:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Data;
using Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo;

class Program
{
   static void Main(string[] args)
   {
      Server server = new Server(@".\SQLEXPRESS");
      Database db = server.Databases["Northwind"];
      List<SqlSmoObject> list = new List<SqlSmoObject>();
      DataTable dataTable = db.EnumObjects(DatabaseObjectTypes.StoredProcedure);
      foreach (DataRow row in dataTable.Rows)
      {
         string sSchema = (string)row["Schema"];
         if (sSchema == "sys" || sSchema == "INFORMATION_SCHEMA")
            continue;
         StoredProcedure sp = (StoredProcedure)server.GetSmoObject(
            new Urn((string)row["Urn"]));
         if (!sp.IsSystemObject)
            list.Add(sp);
      }
      Scripter scripter = new Scripter();
      scripter.Server = server;
      scripter.Options.IncludeHeaders = true;
      scripter.Options.SchemaQualify = true;
      scripter.Options.ToFileOnly = true;
      scripter.Options.FileName = @"C:\StoredProcedures.sql";
      scripter.Script(list.ToArray());
   }
}

See also: SQL Server: SMO Scripting Basics.

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may also find required references in C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\100\SDK\Assemblies –  user423430 Feb 8 '12 at 17:20
1  
I also had to reference Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Sdk.Sfc –  user423430 Feb 9 '12 at 13:03
1  
As of Sql Server 2008R2, the URN class has moved to namespace Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Sdk.Sfc in assembly Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Sdk.Sfc. –  Alexander Garden Mar 27 '13 at 19:14

This blog post suggests running this against your database:

select * from sys.procedures
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;WITH ROUTINES AS (
    -- CANNOT use INFORMATION_SCHEMA.ROUTINES because of 4000 character limit
    SELECT o.type_desc AS ROUTINE_TYPE
            ,o.[name] AS ROUTINE_NAME
            ,m.definition AS ROUTINE_DEFINITION
    FROM sys.sql_modules AS m
    INNER JOIN sys.objects AS o
        ON m.object_id = o.object_id
)
SELECT *
FROM ROUTINES
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You can use:

DataTable  dtProcs = sqlConn.GetSchema("Procedures", new string[] { databaseName });
DataTable  dtProcParams = sqlConn.GetSchema("ProcedureParameters", new string[] { databaseName });

You can also get all sorts of other schema info like tables, indexes etc. if you need them.

You can get info on GetSchema() here and info on the SQL Server Schema Collections here

Edit: Sorry, this doesn't help with actually scripting the info, but I guess it's useful info to have.

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public static void GenerateTableScript()
    {
        Server databaseServer = default(Server);//DataBase Server Name
        databaseServer = new Server("yourDatabase Server Name");
        string strFileName = @"C:\Images\Your FileName_" + DateTime.Today.ToString("yyyyMMdd") + ".sql"; //20120720`enter code here
        if (System.IO.File.Exists(strFileName))
            System.IO.File.Delete(strFileName);
        List<SqlSmoObject> list = new List<SqlSmoObject>();
        Scripter scripter = new Scripter(databaseServer);
        Database dbUltimateSurvey = databaseServer.Databases["YourDataBaseName"];//DataBase Name
        //Table scripting Writing
        DataTable dataTable1 = dbUltimateSurvey.EnumObjects(DatabaseObjectTypes.Table);
        foreach (DataRow drTable in dataTable1.Rows)
        {
            //string strTableSchema = (string)drTable["Schema"];
            //if (strTableSchema == "dbo")
            //    continue;
            Table dbTable = (Table)databaseServer.GetSmoObject(new Urn((string)drTable["Urn"]));
            if (!dbTable.IsSystemObject)
                if (dbTable.Name.Contains("SASTool_"))
                    list.Add(dbTable);
        }
        scripter.Server = databaseServer;
        scripter.Options.IncludeHeaders = true;
        scripter.Options.SchemaQualify = true;
        scripter.Options.ToFileOnly = true;
        scripter.Options.FileName = strFileName;
        scripter.Options.DriAll = true;
        scripter.Options.AppendToFile = true;
        scripter.Script(list.ToArray());//Table Script completed
        //Store Procedures scripting Writing
        list = new List<SqlSmoObject>();
        DataTable dataTable = dbUltimateSurvey.EnumObjects(DatabaseObjectTypes.StoredProcedure);
        foreach (DataRow row in dataTable.Rows)
        {
            string sSchema = (string)row["Schema"];
            if (sSchema == "sys" || sSchema == "INFORMATION_SCHEMA")
                continue;
            StoredProcedure sp = (StoredProcedure)databaseServer.GetSmoObject(
               new Urn((string)row["Urn"]));
            if (!sp.IsSystemObject)
                if (sp.Name.Contains("custom_"))
                    list.Add(sp);
        }
        scripter.Server = databaseServer;
        scripter.Options.IncludeHeaders = true;
        scripter.Options.SchemaQualify = true;
        scripter.Options.ToFileOnly = true;
        scripter.Options.FileName = strFileName;
        scripter.Options.DriAll = true;
        scripter.Options.AppendToFile = true;
        scripter.Script(list.ToArray());//Storeprocedure Script completed
    }
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You can write C# code to run the following query on your database.

Select * from sys.procedures
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I think this is what you're really looking for:

select SPECIFIC_NAME,ROUTINE_DEFINITION from information_schema.routines

There are a ton of other useful columns in there too...

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ROUTINE_DEFINITION in INFORMATION_SCHEMA (in SQL 2005) unfortunately is truncated for long SPs. I will track down my code for this and post it in another answer. –  Cade Roux Oct 4 '08 at 0:22
begin
--select column_name from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS where TABLE_NAME='Products' 
--Declare the Table variable 
DECLARE @GeneratedStoredProcedures TABLE
(
		Number INT IDENTITY(1,1), --Auto incrementing Identity column
		name VARCHAR(300) --The string value
)

--Decalre a variable to remember the position of the current delimiter
DECLARE @CurrentDelimiterPositionVar INT 
declare @sqlCode varchar(max)
--Decalre a variable to remember the number of rows in the table
DECLARE @Count INT

--Populate the TABLE variable using some logic
INSERT INTO @GeneratedStoredProcedures SELECT name FROM sys.procedures where name like 'procGen_%'

--Initialize the looper variable
SET @CurrentDelimiterPositionVar = 1

--Determine the number of rows in the Table
SELECT @Count=max(Number) from @GeneratedStoredProcedures

--A variable to hold the currently selected value from the table
DECLARE @CurrentValue varchar(300);

--Loop through until all row processing is done
WHILE @CurrentDelimiterPositionVar <= @Count
BEGIN
	--Load current value from the Table
	SELECT @CurrentValue = name FROM @GeneratedStoredProcedures WHERE Number = @CurrentDelimiterPositionVar 
	--Process the current value
	--print @CurrentValue
	set @sqlCode = 'drop procedure ' + @CurrentValue
	print @sqlCode
	--exec (@sqlCode)


	--Increment loop counter
	SET @CurrentDelimiterPositionVar = @CurrentDelimiterPositionVar + 1;
END

end
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If you open up a can of reflector on sqlmetal.exe (a stand-alone part of LINQ-to-SQL that generates code from a database), you can see the SQL statements it uses to get a list of all stored procedures and functions. The SQL is similar, but not identical, to the one in this answer.

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Assuming you have SqlConnection object called sqlCon, simplest way is to call sqlCon.GetSchema("Procedures")

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