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Every day I get a log file like:

/home/ado/log/log.20130605

The log file contains item ids and the number of times the id was sold. And Im making a daily and weekly ranking.

So I have a log reader like this

    #!/usr/bin/perl
    use strict;
    use warnings;
    use POSIX 'strftime';

    my $current_date = strftime "%Y%m%d", localtime;
    my $filename     = "/home/ado/log/log.$current_date";

    open my $file, "<", $filename or die("$!: $filename");
    while (<$file>) {
        if (/item_id:(\d+)\s*,\s*start/) {
            $output{$1}++;
        }
    }
    close $file;
    for my $item(keys %output) {
        print "$item -> $output{$item}\n";
    }

I save this in a DB.

And i use the cron command to run this every day. So far I have everything to make a ranking daily.

But How about weekly?

That would imply making a new script that reads at once 7 files:

    /home/ado/log/log.20130603
    /home/ado/log/log.20130604
    /home/ado/log/log.20130605
    /home/ado/log/log.20130606
    /home/ado/log/log.20130607
    /home/ado/log/log.20130608
    /home/ado/log/log.20130609

And searches for the regex. Then I would use cron to run it weekly.

How do I modify the script to read 7 files instead of one, noting that the filenames are constantly changing? – adriancdperu 4 mins ago edit

share|improve this question
    
So what is your question? –  innaM Jun 5 '13 at 7:08
    
stackoverflow.com/a/2916879/1273830 might be useful. –  Prasanth Jun 5 '13 at 7:10
    
@innaM How do I modify the script to read 7 files instead of one, noting that the filenames are constantly changing? –  ado Jun 5 '13 at 7:10
    
This won't compile under strict because %output isn't scoped –  Zaid Jun 5 '13 at 7:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I suggest you use Time::Piece to find all the relevant file names and put them into @ARGV as if they had been entered as command-line parameters. Then you can just read from all of them using <>.

Like this

use strict;
use warnings;

use Time::Piece;
use Time::Seconds 'ONE_DAY';

my $today = localtime;
@ARGV = grep {
  /\.(\d{8})$/ and
      $today - Time::Piece->strptime($1, '%Y%m%d') < ONE_DAY * 7;
} glob '/home/ado/log/log.*';

while (<>) {
  ++$output{$1} if /item_id:(\d+)[\s,]*start/;
}

printf "%s -> %s\n", $_, $output{$_} for sort keys %output;
share|improve this answer

Added loop around file processing, and collecting all log files before that,

    #!/usr/bin/perl
    use strict;
    use warnings;
    use POSIX 'strftime';

    # my $current_date = strftime "%Y%m%d", localtime;
    # my $filename     = "/home/ado/log/log.$current_date";
    my @filenames     = reverse sort glob("/home/ado/log/log.*");
    if (@filenames > 7) { $#filenames=6; }

    for my $filename (@filenames) {

      my %output;
      open my $file, "<", $filename or die("$!: $filename");
      while (<$file>) {
          if (/item_id:(\d+)\s*,\s*start/) {
              $output{$1}++;
          }
      }
      close $file;
      for my $item(keys %output) {
          print "$item->$output{$item}\n";
      }

    }
share|improve this answer
    
thanks but just a question wouldnt glob("/home/ado/log/log.*"); read all the log files that start with log., not only the 7 most recent files? –  ado Jun 5 '13 at 7:26
    
updated for 7 recent files –  Сухой27 Jun 5 '13 at 7:37
    
This doesn't account for the possibility that there may have been no sales log on any one day. –  Borodin Jun 5 '13 at 9:05
    
OP:7 most recent files not days –  Сухой27 Jun 5 '13 at 9:28
    
@mpapec one little question sorry, I found that in line: reverse sort glob("/home/ado/log/log.*"); ... if i want to change /home/ado for $ENV{"HOME"} glob does not seem to work. Does glob not recognize variables as arguments? –  ado Jun 11 '13 at 5:09

Write the program that takes a set of input files as arguments, and writes to standard output.

Invoke the program with the 7 daily input files as arguments, and redirect its standard output to your weekly summary.

summarize_files file1 file2 file3 file4 file5 file6 file7 > weekly.summary

You can use the same program with a single daily input file and redirect its standard output to your daily summary too.

summarize_files file1 > daily.summary

You can also arrange to use file names between two offsets from today's date, specified in days, to generate the names of the input files:

 summarize_files -7 -1 > weekly.$(date +%Y%m%d)
 summarize_files -1 -1 > daily.$(date +%Y%m%d)
share|improve this answer

Use of threads can be helpful too!

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use threads;

my ($fh1, $fh2, $fh3, $fh4, $fh5, $fh6, $fh7);
my $thr1 = threads->new(\&sub1, "file1", $fh1);
my $thr2 = threads->new(\&sub1, "file2", $fh2);
my $thr3 = threads->new(\&sub1, "file3", $fh3);
my $thr4 = threads->new(\&sub1, "file4", $fh4);
my $thr5 = threads->new(\&sub1, "file5", $fh5);
my $thr6 = threads->new(\&sub1, "file6", $fh6);
my $thr7 = threads->new(\&sub1, "file7", $fh7);

$thr1->join();
$thr2->join();
$thr3->join();
$thr4->join();
$thr5->join();
$thr6->join();
$thr7->join();

sub sub1 {
    my ($file, $fh) = @_;

    my %output;
    open $fh, "<", $file or die("$!: $file");
    while (<$fh>) {
          if (/item_id:(\d+)\s*,\s*start/) {
              $output{$1}++;
          }
    }
    close $fh;
    for my $item (keys %output) {
        print "$item->$output{$item}\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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