Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For a proof of concept I have loaded ~54 million records into mongodb. The goal is to investigate the query speed of mongodb.

I use the following class to store the data:

[BsonDiscriminator("Part", Required = true)]
public class Part
{
   [BsonId]
    public ObjectId Id { get; set; }
   [BsonElement("pgc")]
   public int PartGroupCode { get; set; }
   [BsonElement("sc")]
   public int SupplierCode { get; set; }
   [BsonElement("ref")]
   public string ReferenceNumber { get; set; }

   [BsonElement("oem"), BsonIgnoreIfNull]
   public List<OemReference> OemReferences { get; set; }

   [BsonElement("alt"), BsonIgnoreIfNull]
   public List<AltReference> AltReferences { get; set; }

   [BsonElement("crs"), BsonIgnoreIfNull]
   public List<CrossReference> CrossReferences { get; set; }

   [BsonElement("old"), BsonIgnoreIfNull]
   public List<FormerReference> FormerReferences { get; set; }

   [BsonElement("sub"), BsonIgnoreIfNull]
   public List<SubPartReference> SubPartReferences { get; set; }
}

And I created the following indexes:

  • Compound Index on ref, sc, pgc
  • Ascending Index on oem.refoem
  • Ascending Index on alt.refalt
  • Ascending Index on crs.refcrs
  • Ascending Index on old.refold
  • Ascending Index on sub.refsub

I perform the following queries to test the performance:

var searchValue = "345";
var start = DateTime.Now;
var result1 = collection.AsQueryable<Part>().OfType<Part>().Where(part => part.ReferenceNumber == searchValue);
long count = result1.Count();
var finish = DateTime.Now;

start = DateTime.Now;
var result2 = collection.AsQueryable<Part>().OfType<Part>().Where(part =>
    part.ReferenceNumber.Equals(searchValue) ||
    part.OemReferences.Any(oem => oem.ReferenceNumber.Equals(searchValue)) ||
    part.AltReferences.Any(alt => alt.ReferenceNumber.Equals(searchValue)) ||
    part.CrossReferences.Any(crs => crs.ReferenceNumber.Equals(searchValue)) ||
    part.FormerReferences.Any(old => old.ReferenceNumber.Equals(searchValue))
    );
count = result2.Count();
finish = DateTime.Now;

start = DateTime.Now;
var result3 = collection.AsQueryable<Part>().OfType<Part>().Where(part =>
    part.ReferenceNumber.StartsWith(searchValue) ||
    part.OemReferences.Any(oem => oem.ReferenceNumber.StartsWith(searchValue)) ||
    part.AltReferences.Any(alt => alt.ReferenceNumber.StartsWith(searchValue)) ||
    part.CrossReferences.Any(crs => crs.ReferenceNumber.StartsWith(searchValue)) ||
    part.FormerReferences.Any(old => old.ReferenceNumber.StartsWith(searchValue))
    );
count = result3.Count();
finish = DateTime.Now;

var regex = new Regex("^345"); //StartsWith regex
start = DateTime.Now;
var result4 = collection.AsQueryable<Part>().OfType<Part>().Where(part =>
    regex.IsMatch(part.ReferenceNumber) ||
    part.OemReferences.Any(oem => regex.IsMatch(oem.ReferenceNumber)) ||
    part.AltReferences.Any(alt => regex.IsMatch(alt.ReferenceNumber)) ||
    part.CrossReferences.Any(crs => regex.IsMatch(crs.ReferenceNumber)) ||
    part.FormerReferences.Any(old => regex.IsMatch(old.ReferenceNumber))
    );
count = result4.Count();
finish = DateTime.Now;

The results are not what I would have expected:

  • Search 1 on 345 results in: 3 records (00:00:00.3635937)
  • Search 2 on 345 results in: 58 records (00:00:00.0671566)
  • Search 3 on 345 results in: 6189 records (00:01:17.6638459)
  • Search 4 on 345 results in: 6189 records (00:01:17.0727802)

Why is the StartsWith query (3 and 4) so much slower? The StartsWith query performance is the make or break decision.

Did I create the wrong indexes? Any help is appreciated.

Using mongodb with the 10gen C# driver

UPDATE: The way the query is translated from Linq to a MongoDB query is very important for the performance. I build the same query (like 3 and 4) again but with the Query object:

var query5 = Query.And(
    Query.EQ("_t", "Part"),
    Query.Or(
    Query.Matches("ref", "^345"),
    Query.Matches("oem.refoem", "^345"),
    Query.Matches("alt.refalt", "^345"),
    Query.Matches("crs.refcrs", "^345"),
    Query.Matches("old.refold", "^345")));

start = DateTime.Now;
var result5 = collection.FindAs<Part>(query5);
count = result5.Count();
finish = DateTime.Now;

The result of this query is returned in 00:00:00.4522972

The query translated as command: { count: "PSG", query: { _t: "Part", $or: [ { ref: /^345/ }, { oem.refoem: /^345/ }, { alt.refalt: /^345/ }, { crs.refcrs: /^345/ }, { old.refold: /^345/ } ] } }

Compared with Query 3 and 4 the difference is big: command: { count: "PSG", query: { _t: "Part", $or: [ { ref: /^345/ }, { oem: { $elemMatch: { refoem: /^345/ } } }, { alt: { $elemMatch: { refalt: /^345/ } } }, { crs: { $elemMatch: { refcrs: /^345/ } } }, { old: { $elemMatch: { refold: /^345/ } } } ] } }

So why is query 3 and 4 not using the indexes?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

From the index documentation:

Every query, including update operations, uses one and only one index.

In other words, MongoDB doesn't support index intersection. Thus, creating a huge number of indexes is pointless unless there are queries that use this index and this index only. Also, make sure you're calling the correct Count() method here. If you call the linq-to-object extensions (IEnumerable's Count() extension rather than MongoCursor's Count, it will actually have to fetch and hydrate all objects).

It is probably easier to throw these in a single mutli-key index like this:

{ 
    "References" : [ { id: new ObjectId("..."), "_t" : "OemReference", ... }, 
                     { id: new ObjectId("..."), "_t" : "CrossReferences", ...} ],
    ...
}

where References.id is indexed. Now, a query db.foo.find({"References.id" : new ObjectId("...")}) will automatically search for any match in the array of references. Since I assume the different types of references must be distinguished, it makes sense to use a discriminator so the driver can support polymorphic deserialization. In C#, you'd declare this like

[BsonDiscriminator(Required=true)]
[BsonKnownTypes(typeof(OemReference), typeof(...), ...)]
class Reference { ... }

class OemReference : Reference { ... }

The driver will automatically serialize the type name in a field called _t. That behaviour can be adjusted to your needs, if required.

Also note that shortening the property names will decrease storage requirements, but won't affect index size.

share|improve this answer
    
The MongoDB’s New Matcher will solve the issue with huge number of indexes being pointless: "One planned optimization is index intersection" –  vinipsmaker Jun 6 '13 at 4:47
    
Thanks for your advice. The answer that I am looking for is why the StartsWith queries are so much slower. Should I design the indexes differently for that functionality? Or should I try to use the full text search instead? –  EricS Jun 10 '13 at 7:45
    
Hm, I think it would be helpful if you could post the command line equivalent, i.e. what commands are sent to the server, exactly. Try using the integrated profiler to get the query that is sent to the server. –  mnemosyn Jun 10 '13 at 11:57
    
See the commands of the two StartsWith queries in my comments. The indexes created are with the punctuation in the field name, eg oem.refoem. –  EricS Jun 10 '13 at 14:15
    
Using this query improves performance significantly : db.getCollection("PSG").find( { _t: "Part", $or: [ {"oem.refoem": /^345/ }, {"alt.refalt": /^345/}, {"crs.refcrs": /^345/}, {"old.refold": /^345/} ] } ) How can I create this query using the C# Linq driver? –  EricS Jun 10 '13 at 15:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.