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My Google skills haven't been able to find any.

Has anyone heard of any C library for L-BFGS-B?

I have found libLBFGS. But that's a port of L-BFGS, and I need the bound-constrained method.

I suppose I could also try porting it with f2c, but that is something I have never done before. Does anyone have any experience with that?

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Why can't you use the original and call it from C? –  Vladimir F Jun 5 '13 at 15:37
    
He probably does not want to wrap it in a lib for some random reason ? –  BlueTrin Jun 5 '13 at 15:46

2 Answers 2

Not really a C library. But I wrote a C++ implementation (using Eigen for vectorized calculations) that does not use any Fortran routines or f2c. Only C++11.

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About a C port

According to the Wikipedia entry for BFGS, a port of L-BFGS-B has been done using f2c and they provide a link.

Using f2c

If it does not work, you can use f2c to convert the fortran code in C. To do this, the easiest would be to use something like an Ubuntu (a Linux distribution), then install the package f2c if it is not installed by typing:

sudo apt-get install f2c

then you can view f2c documentation by typing:

man 1 f2c

There is a HTML man page for h2c here, but it seems that you should be able to make it work by just typing:

 f2c -Aa <your fortran file>

(this is me by just guessing from the file)

Alternatives

Alternatively you can try to compile f2c under Win32 and do the above. Or like @VladimirF said, you can make a library (DLL under Windows) and just call the function from it.

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Yes i saw that too. But as I said in the question, I have little experience in using f2c so that's why I am asking around... –  c00kiemonster Jun 5 '13 at 9:03
    
Did you try using the link I gave you with the VS project, it is the result of using f2c and wrapping this in a VS project ? –  BlueTrin Jun 5 '13 at 11:08

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