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Can we use "&" in a url ? or should "and" be used?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes, you can use it plain in your URL path like this:

http://example.com/Alice&Bob

Only if you want to use it in the query you need to encode it with %26:

http://example.com/?arg=Alice%26Bob

Otherwise it would be interpreted as argument separator when interpreted as application/x-www-form-urlencoded.

See RFC 3986 for more details.

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An URL is generally in the form

scheme://host/some/path/to/file?query1=value&query2=value

So it is not advisable to use it in an URL unless you want to use it for parameters. Otherwise you should percent escape it using %26, e.g.

http://www.example.com/hello%26world

This results in the path being submitted as hello&world. There are other characters which must be escaped when used out of context in an URL. See here for a list.

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You don’t need to encode it when used in the URL path. –  Gumbo Nov 7 '09 at 17:15
    
Ok, I didn't know that. I just read the part about encoding in the RFC you linked in your answer. But if I understood this correctly it seems that example.com/Alice&Bob and example.com/Alice%26Bob are not considered equivalent and may be interpreted differently by an application (which is though not the case with HTTP as you pointed out). –  Fönsi Nov 7 '09 at 20:31

Unless you're appending variables to the query string, encode it.

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encode '&' with & (this answer is based on your use of tags)

If you are asking what to use "&" or "and" when registering the name of your URL, I would use "and".

EDIT: As mentioned in comments "& is an HTML character entity and not a URI character entity. By putting that into a URI you still have the ampersand character and additional extraneous characters." I started answering before fully understanding your question.

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1  
& is an HTML character entity and not a URI character entity. By putting that into a URI you still have the ampersand character and additional extraneous characters. –  austin cheney Nov 7 '09 at 16:50
    
Face palm Right, posted before thinking that through. Down vote as appropriate. –  MarkPowell Nov 7 '09 at 16:53
    
Just delete your answer instead of asking for down votes :) –  truppo Nov 7 '09 at 16:55
    
Well, you have to use &amp; in a URL inside a link, e.g: <a href="example.com/x&amp;y">;. You are correct in that case. (SO is messing up my example,but you get the idea.) –  Dangph Nov 7 '09 at 17:07
    
s/&amp;/%26/ and you're golden –  outis Nov 7 '09 at 17:29

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