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Given that I have a worker subscribed to two queues 'Low' and 'High', I would like the worker to only work on messages from the low priority queue if the high priority queue is empty.

I'm attempting to do this by defining two channels and setting the prefetch to a higher value on the higher priority queue, as suggested here: http://dougbarth.github.io/2011/07/01/approximating-priority-with-rabbitmq.html

This is my worker code:

require "rubygems"
require "amqp"

EventMachine.run do
  connection = AMQP.connect(:host => '127.0.0.1')
  channel_low  = AMQP::Channel.new(connection)
  channel_high  = AMQP::Channel.new(connection)

  # Attempting to set the prefetch higher on the high priority queue
  channel_low.prefetch(10)
  channel_high.prefetch(20)

  low_queue    = channel_low.queue("low", :auto_delete => false)
  high_queue    = channel_high.queue("high", :auto_delete => false)

  low_queue.subscribe do |payload|
    puts "#{payload}"
    slow_task
  end

  high_queue.subscribe do |payload|
    puts "#{payload}"
    slow_task
  end

  def slow_task
    # Do some slow work
    sleep(1)
  end
end

When I run this client against it I do not see the high priority messages processed first:

require "rubygems"
require "amqp"

EventMachine.run do
  connection = AMQP.connect(:host => '127.0.0.1')
  channel  = AMQP::Channel.new(connection)

  low_queue    = channel.queue("low")
  high_queue    = channel.queue("high")
  exchange = channel.direct("")

  10.times do |i| 
    message = "LOW #{i}"
    puts "sending: #{message}"
    exchange.publish message, :routing_key => low_queue.name
  end

  # EventMachine.add_periodic_timer(0.0001) do
  10.times do |i|
    message = "HIGH #{i}"
    puts "sending: #{message}"
    exchange.publish message, :routing_key => high_queue.name
  end

end

Output:

Client >>>
sending: LOW 0
sending: LOW 1
sending: LOW 2
sending: LOW 3
sending: LOW 4
sending: LOW 5
sending: LOW 6
sending: LOW 7
sending: LOW 8
sending: LOW 9
sending: HIGH 0
sending: HIGH 1
sending: HIGH 2
sending: HIGH 3
sending: HIGH 4
sending: HIGH 5
sending: HIGH 6
sending: HIGH 7
sending: HIGH 8
sending: HIGH 9

Server >>>

HIGH 0
HIGH 1
LOW 0
LOW 1
LOW 2
HIGH 2
LOW 3
LOW 4
LOW 5
LOW 6
LOW 7
HIGH 3
LOW 8
LOW 9
HIGH 4
HIGH 5
HIGH 6
HIGH 7
HIGH 8
HIGH 9
share|improve this question
    
do never ever use sleep in eventmachine, it will pause the whole eventloop, you're concurrency goes out the window. Use EM.add_timer instead. And remember to manually ack your messages only when you're done with them. –  Carl Hörberg Jun 5 '13 at 15:44
1  
prefetch won't dictate any priority, only how many messages that will be hold "inflight", ie. messaged delivered to the client but not yet ack:ed messages, so it's more about concurrency than priority.. –  Carl Hörberg Jun 5 '13 at 15:47
    
I'm using the sleep delay to simulate the real worker, which runs a blocking operation that takes around 0.3 seconds to complete. This is the reason this code is broken out as a worker. –  dangerous.beans Jun 5 '13 at 16:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Like Michael said, there's a few issues with your current approach:

  • Not enabling explicit acks means RabbitMQ considers messages delivered when it has sent them, not when you've processed them
  • Your messages are so small that they're able to be delivered quickly over the network
  • Your subscribe block is called when EventMachine reads the network data, once for each full frame of data it read from the socket
  • Finally, blocking the reactor thread (with sleep) will prevent EM from sending the acks out to the socket so the proper behavior isn't achieved.

In order to implement the priority concept, you need to separate receiving the network data from acknowledging it. In our application (which I wrote the blog post about), we used a background thread and a priority queue to reorder the work coming in. This introduces a small buffer of messages in each worker. Some of those messages may be low priority messages that won't be worked until there are no higher priority messages to work on.

Here's a slightly modified worker code that uses a worker thread and a priority queue to get the desired results.

require "rubygems"
require "amqp"
require "pqueue"

EventMachine.run do
  connection = AMQP.connect(:host => '127.0.0.1')
  channel_low  = AMQP::Channel.new(connection)
  channel_high  = AMQP::Channel.new(connection)

  # Attempting to set the prefetch higher on the high priority queue
  channel_low.prefetch(10)
  channel_high.prefetch(20)

  low_queue    = channel_low.queue("low", :auto_delete => false)
  high_queue    = channel_high.queue("high", :auto_delete => false)

  # Our priority queue for buffering messages in the worker's memory
  to_process = PQueue.new {|a,b| a[0] > b[0] }

  # The pqueue gem isn't thread safe
  mutex = Mutex.new

  # Background thread for working blocking operation. We can spin up more of
  # these to increase concurrency.
  Thread.new do
    loop do
      _, header, payload = mutex.synchronize { to_process.pop }

      if payload
        puts "#{payload}"
        slow_task
        # We need to call ack on the EM thread.
        EM.next_tick { header.ack }
      else
        sleep(0.1)
      end
    end
  end

  low_queue.subscribe(:ack => true) do |header, payload|
    mutex.synchronize { to_process << [0, header, payload] }
  end

  high_queue.subscribe(:ack => true) do |header, payload|
    mutex.synchronize { to_process << [10, header, payload] }
  end

  def slow_task
    # Do some slow work
    sleep(1)
  end
end

If you need to increase concurrency, you can spawn more than one background thread.

share|improve this answer

Your approach is one of the most commonly used workarounds. However, there is a couple of issues in the specific example posted.

Prefetch does not control which channel has priority for deliveries. It controls how many messages can be "in progress" (unacknowledged) on it.

This can be used as poor man's prioritization technique, however, you use automatic acknowledgement mode, so prefetch does not come into play (RabbitMQ immediately considers your messages acknowledged as soon as it sends them out).

If you only publish a small number of messages and then your example finishes running, it is much more likely that the ordering will depend greatly on the order you publish messages in.

To see the effect of the prefetch setting with manual acknowledgements, you'd need to run it for a longer period of time (which depends on your message rates, but say, at least a minute.

share|improve this answer

Can you try something like this. I am not sure if this produces what you need, but worth trying.

10.times do 
   10.times do 
      exchange.publish "HIGH", :routing_key => high_queue.name
    end  
   exchange.publish "LOW", :routing_key => low_queue.name
end
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry this probably wasn't clear, the messages all get produced immediately and I'm testing by creating the low ones first. What I'm trying to get working is that the worker works on the high ones before the low ones. (one low one is okay) –  dangerous.beans Jun 5 '13 at 11:55
    
Could you make the sleep to a minute or two and check. sleep(2.minutes) –  Bala Jun 5 '13 at 11:58
    
Set it to sleep(10) and produced this: `LOW LOW LOW LOW LOW LOW LOW LOW LOW LOW HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH –  dangerous.beans Jun 5 '13 at 12:08

You're publishing small messages to a processor which is likely processing them within a couple of milliseconds of their arriving. I suspect what you're seeing here is sample noise, and not what you actually think you're seeing.

Can you verify the order in which the messages are being published is as you expect?

share|improve this answer
    
I added some extra detail to the messages to show their order and edited the test and results above –  dangerous.beans Jun 5 '13 at 13:18
    
You're still displaying the order in which they are consumed, not the order in which they are produced. What you need to do is print the body when publishing, not when consuming. You may find that the publication order is different to what you are assuming it to be. –  mcfinnigan Jun 5 '13 at 13:20
    
Gave that a try and put output on when it's sending messages too. It sends them in the expected order but the other end is still nuts. –  dangerous.beans Jun 5 '13 at 13:34

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