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I am preparing for an interview and decided to brush up my OOP concepts. There are hundreds of articles available, but it seems each describes them differently. Some says

Abstraction is "the process of identifying common patterns that have systematic variations; an abstraction represents the common pattern and provides a means for specifying which variation to use" (Richard Gabriel).

and is achieved through abstract classes.

Some other says

Abstraction means to show only the necessary details to the client of the object

and

Let’s say you have a method "CalculateSalary" in your Employee class, which takes EmployeeId as parameter and returns the salary of the employee for the current month as an integer value. Now if someone wants to use that method. He does not need to care about how Employee object calculates the salary? An only thing he needs to be concern is name of the method, its input parameters and format of resulting member,

I googled again and again and none of the results seem to give me a proper answer. Now, where does encapsulation fit in all these? I searched and found a stack overflow question. Even the answers to that questions were confusing Here, it says

Encapsulation is a strategy used as part of abstraction. Encapsulation refers to the state of objects - objects encapsulate their state and hide it from the outside; outside users of the class interact with it through its methods, but cannot access the classes state directly. So the class abstracts away the implementation details related to its state.

And here another reputed member says,

They are different concepts.

Abstraction is the process of refining away all the unneeded/unimportant attributes of an object and keep only the characteristics best suitable for your domain.

Now I m messed up with the whole concept. I know about abstract class, inheritance, access specifiers and all. I just want to know how should I answer when I am asked about abstraction and/or encapsulation in an interview.

Please don't mark it as a duplicate. I know there are several similar questions. But I want to avoid the confusion among the conflicting explanations. Can anyone suggest a credible link? A link to stackoverflow question is also welcome unless it creates confusion again. :)

EDIT: I need answers, a bit c# oriented

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Also what about abstraction in the sense that a Printer class is an abstraction of a physical printer? –  Matthew Watson Jun 5 '13 at 11:30
    
All these answers confuse me again :( –  Aparan Jun 5 '13 at 11:58
    
I am gonna start a bounty on this question. –  Aparan Jun 5 '13 at 12:23
    
The problem is that there are no precise definitions for these concepts, and the words themselves have multiple meanings even within the context of object orientation. If you talk about that in an interview, I would hope that would be sufficient! –  Matthew Watson Jun 5 '13 at 12:34
    
@MatthewWatson: If you talk about that in an interview, I would hope that would be sufficient! I didn't get you. –  Aparan Jun 5 '13 at 12:36
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6 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Abstraction means to show only the necessary details to the client of the object

Actually that is encapsulation. also see the first part of the wikipedia article in order to not be confused by encapsulation and data hiding. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Encapsulation_(object-oriented_programming)

keep in mind that by simply hiding all you class members 1:1 behind properties is not encapsulation at all. encapsulation is all about protecting invariants and hiding of implementation details.

here a good article about that. http://blog.ploeh.dk/2012/11/27/Encapsulationofproperties/ also take a look at the articles linked in that article.

classes, properties and access modifiers are tools to provide encapsulation in c#.

you do encapsulation in order to reduce complexity.

Abstraction is "the process of identifying common patterns that have systematic variations; an abstraction represents the common pattern and provides a means for specifying which variation to use" (Richard Gabriel).

Yes, that is a good definition for abstraction.

They are different concepts. Abstraction is the process of refining away all the unneeded/unimportant attributes of an object and keep only the characteristics best suitable for your domain.

Yes, they are different concepts. keep in mind that abstraction is actually the opposite of making an object suitable for YOUR domain ONLY. it is in order to make the object suitable for the domain in general!

if you have a actual problem and provide a specific solution, you can use abstraction to formalize a more generic solution that can also solve more problems that have the same common pattern. that way you can increase the re-usability for your components or use components made by other programmers that are made for the same domain, or even for different domains.

good examples are classes provided by the .net framework, for example list or collection. these are very abstract classes that you can use almost everywhere and in a lot of domains. Imagine if .net only implemented a EmployeeList class and a CompanyList that could only hold a list of employees and companies with specific properties. such classes would be useless in a lot of cases. and what a pain would it be if you had to re-implement the whole functionality for a CarList for example. So the "List" is ABSTRACTED away from Employee, Company and Car. The List by itself is an abstract concept that can be implemented by its own class.

Interfaces, abstract classes or inheritance and polymorphism are tools to provide abstraction in c#.

you do abstraction in order to provide reusability.

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stackoverflow.com/a/8960961/2401223 It says Encapsulation is a strategy used as part of abstraction –  Aparan Jun 6 '13 at 4:24
    
I see .. there are different meanings behind abstraction. Wikipedia also differs between "Abstraction" and the "Abstraction principle". Stick to what Matthew Watson told you in the comments "The problem is that there are no precise definitions for these concepts, and the words themselves have multiple meanings even within the context of object orientation." As long as you can give them one ore more meanings in an interview everything will be fine :) –  Egi Jun 6 '13 at 8:05
    
Thank you. I m gonna follow that advice :) –  Aparan Jun 6 '13 at 11:43
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encapsulation means-hiding data like using getter and setter etc.

Abstraction means- hiding implementation using abstract class and interfaces etc

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I think they are slightly different concepts, but often they are applied together. Encapsulation is a technique for hiding implementation details from the caller, whereas abstraction is more a design philosophy involving creating objects that are analogous to familiar objects/processes, to aid understanding. Encapsulation is just one of many techniques that can be used to create an abstraction.

For example, take "windows". They are not really windows in the traditional sense, they are just graphical squares on the screen. But it's useful to think of them as windows. That's an abstraction.

If the "windows API" hides the details of how the text or graphics is physically rendered within the boundaries of a window, that's encapsulation.

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Can you provide a source to back your concept? –  Aparan Jun 5 '13 at 11:59
    
This Wikipedia page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abstraction_(computer_science) contains a good example in Java, with a class called "animal" which is an abstraction. The class encapsulates the fact that an animal has "EnergyReserves" - the caller doesn't need to know this. Instead, the caller simply knows whether the animal "isHungry". EnergyReserves is hidden (encapsulated). –  Mike Panter Jun 7 '13 at 1:54
    
thank you for the link –  Aparan Jun 7 '13 at 3:44
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One example has always been brought up to me in the context of abstraction; the automatic vs. manual transmission on cars. The manual transmission hides some of the workings of changing gears, but you still have to clutch and shift as a driver. Automatic transmission encapsulates all the details of changing gears, i.e. hides it from you, and it is therefore a higher abstraction of the process of changing gears.

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"Automatic transmission encapsulates all the details of changing gears, i.e. hides it from you" ... actually that is why I would say that the automatic vs. manual transmission on cars is a good example for ENCAPSULATION! and not for abstraction. automatic transmission is not an abstraction of the manual transmission, it is another concept. an abstraction would be if you say that a car needs a power transmission system ignoring how the actual interface for the driver will be (automatic or manual). –  Egi Jun 5 '13 at 13:41
    
I see your point. The way I see it though, abstraction and encapsulation are related. If you don't have any encapsulation you don't have any abstraction. Through encapsulation you can find more abstract concepts, so the automatic transmission is a better abstraction than the manual transmission. Maybe you don't even need a concept for transmission, perhaps you only need the concept of a car moving forward, that would encapsulate all of the internal workings of the car. –  Lorentz Vedeler Jun 5 '13 at 14:30
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I absolutely agree with your last statement. you can abstract everything away until nobody has an idea what it is actually about anymore. but I disagree with your first statement. you can practice encapsulation without abstraction, for example by making a program with only one big class that handles everything and hides all the implementation details from the client. and abstraction without encapsulation is also possible by making a program out of classes that are small and have a single responsibility yet do not hide any implementation details or any invalid state. –  Egi Jun 5 '13 at 15:10
    
both extremes would be a maintenance nightmare of course ;D –  Egi Jun 5 '13 at 15:12
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my 2c

the purpose of encapsulation is to hide implementation details from the user of your class e.g. if you internally keep a std::list of items in your class and then decide that a std::vector would be more effective you can change this without the user caring. That said, the way you interact with the either stl container is thanks to abstraction, both the list and the vector can for instance be traversed in the same way using similar methods (iterators).

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what about this: stackoverflow.com/a/8961003/2401223 –  Aparan Jun 5 '13 at 12:11
    
with all due respect I will stick with my explanation :) i.e. encapsuling hiding from user, abstraction more of a common concept like an interface that several classes share. –  Claptrap Jun 5 '13 at 12:14
    
Hm.. This is what I said in my question itself. Everyone has his own concepts on this topic :). Can you provide a credible link to back your explanation? –  Aparan Jun 5 '13 at 12:16
    
codeproject.com/Questions/298285/… –  Aparan Jun 5 '13 at 12:24
    
no i don't have a link, this is how I have understood it from various books like Code Complete. –  Claptrap Jun 5 '13 at 12:31
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As I knowit, encapsulation is hiding data of classes in themselves, and only making it accessible via setters / getters, if they must be accessed from the outer world.

Abstraction is the class design for itself.

Means, how You create Your class tree, which methods are general ones, which are inherited, which can be overridden,which attributes are only on private level, or on protected, how Do You build up Your class inheritance tree, Do You use final classes, abtract classes, interface-implementation.

Abstraction is more placed the oo-design phase, while encapsulation also enrolls into developmnent-phase.

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