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Can someone please explain to me what I'm doing wrong and why this doesn't work? I'm simply trying to get values from a registry key and return them to the main function as a dictionary.

    public Dictionary<string, string> ListPrograms()
    {
        ///List<object> Apps = new List<object>();
        Dictionary<string, string> Apps = new Dictionary<string, string>();
        string registryKey = "SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\Windows\\CurrentVersion\\Uninstall";
        using (Microsoft.Win32.RegistryKey key =  Registry.LocalMachine.OpenSubKey(registryKey))
        {
            (from a in key.GetSubKeyNames()
                    let r = key.OpenSubKey(a)
                    select new
                    {
                        DisplayName = r.GetValue("DisplayName"),
                        RegistryKey = r.GetValue("UninstallString")
                    })
                .Distinct()
                .OrderBy(c => c.DisplayName)
                .Where(c => c.DisplayName != null && c.RegistryKey != null)
                .ToDictionary(k => k.RegistryKey.ToString(), v => v.DisplayName.ToString());
        } 
        return Apps;
    }

After I retrieve the dictionary I'm binding it to a listbox.

        listBox1.DisplayMember = "Value";
        listBox1.ValueMember = "Key";
        listBox1.DataSource = new BindingSource(u.ListPrograms(), null);

My listbox, however, is always empty. Is there a more efficient way to do this?

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1  
Where do you affect Apps (the return value) ? –  Fares Jun 5 '13 at 12:40
    
Your ListPrograms function is now the same as return new Dictionary<string, string>(); because you do not alter the Apps variable –  JP Hellemons Jun 5 '13 at 12:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your code

In Line (from a in key.GetSubKeyNames()

change it to

Apps = (from a in key.GetSubKeyNames()
                let r = key.OpenSubKey(a)
                select new
                {
                    DisplayName = r.GetValue("DisplayName"),
                    RegistryKey = r.GetValue("UninstallString")
                })
            .Distinct()
            .OrderBy(c => c.DisplayName)
            .Where(c => c.DisplayName != null && c.RegistryKey != null)
            .ToDictionary(k => k.RegistryKey.ToString(), v => v.DisplayName.ToString());

Update

Here is working code

    public static Dictionary<string, string> ListPrograms()
    {
        Dictionary<string, string> Apps = new Dictionary<string, string>();
        string registryKey = "SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\Windows\\CurrentVersion\\Uninstall";
        using (Microsoft.Win32.RegistryKey key = Registry.LocalMachine.OpenSubKey(registryKey))
        {
            if (key != null)
            {
                var key1 = key.GetSubKeyNames();
                foreach (var z in key1.Select(s => key.OpenSubKey(s))
                    .Where(b => b != null && b.GetValue("DisplayName") != null && b.GetValue("UninstallString") != null).Select(b => new
                    {
                        DisplayName = b.GetValue("DisplayName").ToString(),
                        RegistryKey = b.GetValue("UninstallString").ToString()
                    }).Where(z => !Apps.ContainsKey(z.RegistryKey)))
                {
                    Apps.Add(z.RegistryKey, z.DisplayName);
                }
            }
        }
        return Apps;
    }
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1  
Nealy... App => Apps –  Rawling Jun 5 '13 at 12:43
    
You also want to make sure the keys you inserting into the dictionary are unique! I don't think the RegistryKey is really a key, meaning it's unique :-) –  derape Jun 5 '13 at 12:45
    
@derape That's orthogonal to this answer. If you're correct (and I'm not sure you are), OP's code would have found the problem already. –  Rawling Jun 5 '13 at 12:46
    
@Rawling well just ran the code on my machine: "An item with the same key has already been added." :-) –  derape Jun 5 '13 at 12:48
    
@derape You're right, I hadn't looked at the code hard enough and assumed the dictionary key was being populated with the registry key names, which should be unique. Still, this is a problem with the asker's code, not this answer! –  Rawling Jun 5 '13 at 12:53

You never affect the dictionary you create to the variable you return.

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