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I'm working on taking an internal enterprise website that currently requires IE 8 quirks mode to render correctly, and modifying it so that it renders in IE 8 standards mode. One of the issues that is plaguing me is the vastly different appearance of font-size: large (and possibly other font settings, this is the first I noticed).

Using this HTML as a sample:

<html>
    <head>
        <title>IE 8 Quirks Font Size</title>
        <style type="text/css">
            #testDiv
            {
                font-size: large;
            }
        </style>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="testDiv">Here is some text</div>
        <div>And some unstyled text</div>
    </body>
</html>

If you look at that in IE 8 with quirks mode vs. standards mode, here is the difference in appearance:

Obviously the entire site is styled assuming the layout of quirks mode. What I'm looking to find is:

  • Documentation on how IE quirks mode versus standards mode treats fonts differently
  • Some explanation on how to tweak CSS so that it renders like it used to
  • Ideally some magic site-wide CSS that essentially makes fonts render as if quirks mode was still in play
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Try just using an exact font size instead of "large". For instants font-size: 12px or font-size: 12pt –  sinθ Jun 5 '13 at 12:53
    
Is font-size: 12px the equivalent of font-size: large consistently? Otherwise I don't see how this helps me. I'm trying to avoid finding every font-size on the site and tweaking it pixel-by-pixel. –  RationalGeek Jun 5 '13 at 12:57
    
Are the styles all inline? If not, you could replace large in the style sheet(s) with a different value. –  ralph.m Jun 5 '13 at 13:07
    
The styles are all over the place - inline, various stylesheets. It is a large site. That is why I'm looking for something that i can apply globally. If there is no way to do that, I will go through each individually, but that is pain I'd rather avoid if I can. –  RationalGeek Jun 5 '13 at 13:13
    
@RationalGeek Well, first, you shouldn't have that many styles inline, especially BECAUSE it's a large site. How does using pixels not help you? You might be attached to using large, but that's not advisable at all. Why would you have to find every font size on the site and tweak it? If you wrote the CSS well, then you should only have to change the size in one or two places. Anyway, I again fail to see what you would have to tweak. Pixels aren't relative any more than large, so there would actually be less tweaking. –  sinθ Jun 5 '13 at 13:23
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem with font-size in quirks mode is that when using medium, large, x-large etc, the browser is always showing the font as one step larger than in standards mode.

This means large in quirks mode is the same as x-large in standards mode.

Try changing your code to this:

<html>
    <head>
        <title>IE 8 Quirks Font Size</title>
        <style type="text/css">
            #testDiv
            {
                font-size: x-large;
            }
        </style>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="testDiv">Here is some text</div>
        <div>And some unstyled text</div>
    </body>
</html>

That should give you the same result in IE 8 Standards Mode as your current CSS does in Quirks Mode.

You can read about it here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb250395(VS.85).aspx

Keyword Values of the Font-size Property

The medium value of the font-size property matches the default normal font size.

The keyword values of this property include xx-small, x-small, small, medium, large, x-large, and xx-large. With earlier versions of Internet Explorer, these values are not defined intuitively. The medium value is not the default normal font size; small is the default.

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This is much more the type of info that I was looking for. Thanks. –  RationalGeek Jun 5 '13 at 15:56
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I don't know if it will help but you could try setting a relative measurement with EMS

you can use www.pxtoem.com to get and set your base font size to what you might need

then set your base font size on the html element like so html { font-size:1em; } /* 1em makes the font-size on all elements about 16px which is usually browser default */

then just either, set the font-size again on the elements you want to alter their size, but try to avoid nesting your EM Font sizes, IE avoid

<div class="parent" stlye="font-size: 1.5em;">
    <div class="child-nested" style="font-size: 1.8em;"><!-- try to avoid this -->
    </div>
</div>

set the font sizes preferably on your parent, so you know where you stand with nesting, and try to work out what content inside that container is going to be in font-size so you can battle this a bit better. REMS for resetting to the root font-size of your document aren't well supported enough yet really.

alternatively you could just increase font size by percentage, so 110%, 120% etc.

P.S { never put your styling inline with HTML, I've just done that for brevity }

hope this helps

share|improve this answer
    
This might be part of the solution, but it has problems. If you look at my picture, the unstyled font size is pretty much the same between the two modes. So just changing the font-sizing to a higher relative starting point for the whole site probably won't work. But maybe I should just start there and tweak. –  RationalGeek Jun 5 '13 at 13:24
    
Ive just done a "brief test" for IE quirks/standards modes and I can't see any problems with the text changing depending on what mode I've created a pen here codepen.io/seraphzz/pen/xrzJi and in quirks/standards mode it looks the same, although I don't know the entire HTML structure and what font-sizes are set where but it looks ok to me. hope that helps further. Also if you don't need 16px as a base just change that base font-size on the HTML element, if the site has inline styles it may take some messing around to remove those and standardise, but it would be the same if set in CSS. –  RustyRoberts Jun 5 '13 at 13:49
    
You are using ems in that test. My question is referring to the named sizes, such as "large". –  RationalGeek Jun 5 '13 at 14:32
    
Well by using "large" as your choice of measurement your relying on the browser to specify the size of the font for you, which could be eratic between browsers/modes, where as if you were to specify a "length" measurement such as EMS then you're enforcing a more specific relative unit of measurement. If you think about it Large is quite subjective, it's really down to what the browser your using's interpretation of that measurement. so it's always best to avoid using that kind of measurement anywhere. –  RustyRoberts Jun 5 '13 at 18:41
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You might be better off using an exact font size in your CSS (15pt) instead of Large.

Here is a couple of links talking about forcing browser mode using doctype that might be helpful. Also if you are using ASP.NET you might want to look into setting Meta tag to force doc type in IE.

http://hsivonen.iki.fi/doctype/

http://www.quirksmode.org/css/quirksmode.html

share|improve this answer
    
I think you missed the point of my question. I understand how to change the markup so that it renders in standards mode, and I understand how the markup should be styled. But, I have a bunch of existing markup that is styled with things like "font-size: large" and I'm trying to understand how to make them look like they used to in quirks mode in the easiest way possible. –  RationalGeek Jun 5 '13 at 12:56
    
The links I posted discussed using the Doctype to force quirks mode but didn't give an exat example. Look at the following wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quirks_mode . It states that putting anything in front of doctype will force quirks mode in IE 6, 7, 8, and 9. –  StMotorSpark Jun 5 '13 at 13:02
    
I am not asking about how to put the thing into quirks mode. My question is specifically about the treatment of font-sizes differently between the two modes and how to simulate quirks mode font-sizing while in standards mode. Please reread the question. –  RationalGeek Jun 5 '13 at 13:12
    
Sorry for my miss-understanding about your question. Since the browser handles css rendering, javascript dome elements, and possible HTML rendering completely differently in the standard vs quarks mode, you can either request your site to use one or the other, or change your CSS to correctly render regardless of the mode, which requires CSS changes like specific font size. Something like simulating quirks mode must be done by changing CSS if you still want to use Standards mode. There is not much else that can be done from within HTML/CSS itself. –  StMotorSpark Jun 5 '13 at 13:18
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I would recommend selecting a CSS reset, there are several available around the web. This will set your base font as well as a common CSS starting point for your application. Eventually I would tell you to learn how to use scalable font sizes based on em and %. This is a little more advanced but you can get the experience to use them well if you give yourself a chance. Mostly it is an exercise of trial and error to finally get the confidence you need to master CSS.

Oh and I would also push you to get your organization to upgrade to IE 10 as soon as possible. So many great things will become available to you when you do that.

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I agree on both points, but neither address this question. –  RationalGeek Jun 5 '13 at 17:57
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