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If we add 1 month in current date(Fri May 31 18:33:00 IST 2013) it yields:

Sun Jun 30 18:33:00 IST 2013

If we subtract 1 month it yields:

Thu May 30 18:33:00 IST 2013

Is it a bug OR can anyone provide the reasoning?

Please find the code for same:

Calendar c1 = Calendar.getInstance()
System.out.println(c1.getTime());
c1.add(Calendar.MONTH, 1);
System.out.println(c1.getTime());
c1.add(Calendar.MONTH, -1);
System.out.println(c1.getTime());

Output

Fri May 31 18:33:00 IST 2013
Sun Jun 30 18:33:00 IST 2013
Thu May 30 18:33:00 IST 2013
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1  
whats wrong in output? its giving proper dates –  Pankajkumar Kathiriya Jun 5 '13 at 13:30
    
This is the expected behavior. When you add 1 month it cannot go to June 31th since it does not exists, so it goes to June 30th. When you subtracts it goes to May 30th, because it is allowed. –  joaonlima Jun 5 '13 at 13:32
    
i think he thinks that 31.05 + 1 month should be 01.07 or something like that since there is no 31.06. –  Marco Forberg Jun 5 '13 at 13:32

3 Answers 3

The changing of the day of month is the expected behaviour, documented here, as "Add rule 2": http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/Calendar.html

add(f, delta) adds delta to field f. This is equivalent to calling set(f, get(f) + delta) with two adjustments:

Add rule 1. The value of field f after the call minus the value of field f before the call is delta, modulo any overflow that has occurred in field f. Overflow occurs when a field value exceeds its range and, as a result, the next larger field is incremented or decremented and the field value is adjusted back into its range.

Add rule 2. If a smaller field is expected to be invariant, but it is impossible for it to be equal to its prior value because of changes in its minimum or maximum after field f is changed or other constraints, such as time zone offset changes, then its value is adjusted to be as close as possible to its expected value. A smaller field represents a smaller unit of time. HOUR is a smaller field than DAY_OF_MONTH. No adjustment is made to smaller fields that are not expected to be invariant. The calendar system determines what fields are expected to be invariant.

With these rules in place, there's no way to keep the day of month if you add 1 month, followed by adding -1 months.

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No, it's a feature and is documented (sorry being picky here, but did you actually read the docs before asking?). Read the Field Manipulation sectione in the docs about the add() method. Relevant part:

If a smaller field is expected to be invariant, but it is impossible for it to be equal to its prior value because of changes in its minimum or maximum after field f is changed or other constraints, such as time zone offset changes, then its value is adjusted to be as close as possible to its expected value.

Example: Consider a GregorianCalendar originally set to August 31, 1999. Calling add(Calendar.MONTH, 13) sets the calendar to September 30, 2000. Add rule 1 sets the MONTH field to September, since adding 13 months to August gives September of the next year. Since DAY_OF_MONTH cannot be 31 in September in a GregorianCalendar, add rule 2 sets the DAY_OF_MONTH to 30, the closest possible value. Although it is a smaller field, DAY_OF_WEEK is not adjusted by rule 2, since it is expected to change when the month changes in a GregorianCalendar.

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This is correct as it is designed.

When you add one month from May 31st you get June 30th (the last day of the month).

When you subtract one month from June 30th you get May 31st (one month earlier).

The calculation are done when you get the time with getTime(). Therefore I don't see any bug here.

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