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I have a 2D array already filled with integers, ready to be cut to rows and processed, and I need each row (1D array) to be passed to a node of a linked list. Each node looks like this:

struct node {
    int *val;
    struct node *next;
};

New nodes are added and linked this way:

struct node *addnode(int *val, struct node *next, int columns)
{
    struct node *tnode;
    tnode = (struct node*)malloc(sizeof(*tnode));
    if(tnode != NULL) {
        tnode->val = malloc(sizeof(int) * columns);
        memcpy(tnode->val, val, sizeof(int) * columns);
        tnode->val = val;
        tnode->next = next;
    };
    return tnode;
}

The fragment of program that will fill each node looks roughly like so:

int table[rows][columns], i, j;
for (i = 0; i < rows; i++){
    head = addnode(*table, head, columns);
    for (j = 0; j < columns; j++){
        scanf("%d",&table[i][j]);
        head->val[j] = table[j];
        printf("%d ",head->val[j]);
    };
    puts("\n");
};  

I'm uncertain how to proceed in indicated places:

  1. That's malloc for the whole node, but what should I do with malloc for val? I know the length of table that should be in each node, and it's columns, acquired in main function. Where should I allocate memory for it?
  2. Above this line is the place I'd malloc enough (columns) memory for a single row of integers. Is it a good choice?
  3. This, with the precedent loop should fill the current head->val[j] with adequate i-row of 2D array table, but it looks too good to be true. Can I leave it like that?

EDIT: I corrected it in some places, but then after trying to sort it, it returns rubbish. I'll just dump most of the code here:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <ctype.h>
#include <string.h>

struct node {
    int *val;
    struct node *next;
};

struct node *addnode(int *val, struct node *next, int columns);
struct node *mergesort(struct node *head, int column);
struct node *merge(struct node *head_one, struct node *head_two, int column);

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{

    struct node *head;
    struct node *current;
    struct node *next;
    int symbol = 0;
    int columns = 0;
    //int columns = atoi(argv[1]); //until sorting works, I'll keep it at 0
    int rows = 0;
    head = NULL;
    int column = 0; //temporary until I find the way to send one argument during executing it under linux like so 'name_of_program columns < test.txt'
    int lastSpace = 0;

    do {
        symbol = fgetc(stdin);

        if (rows == 0 && (lastSpace == 0 && (isspace(symbol) || feof(stdin)))) {
            columns++;
            lastSpace = 1;
        } else if (!isspace(symbol)) {
            lastSpace = 0;
        }
        if (symbol == '\n' || feof(stdin)) {
            rows++;
        };      
    } while (symbol != EOF);

    if (ferror(stdin))
    {
        printf("Error on reading from file.\n");
    } else {
        printf("The file contains %d row(s) and %d column(s).\n", rows, columns);
    };

    rewind(stdin); //I have heard conflicting opinions on that, but in this case it works, and in the end it's a school project, not commercial code

    int table[rows][columns], i, j;
    for (i = 0; i < rows; i++){
        head = addnode(*table, head, columns);
        for (j = 0; j < columns; j++){
            scanf("%d",&table[i][j]);
            head->val[j] = table[i][j];
            printf("%d ",head->val[j]);
        };
        puts("\n");
    };  


    head = mergesort(head, column);

    for(current = head; current != NULL; current = current->next){
        for (j = 0; j < columns; j++){
            printf("%d ", current->val[j]);
        };
        puts("\n");
    };

    for(current = head; current != NULL; current = next)
      next = current->next, free(current);
    return 0;
};


struct node *addnode(int *val, struct node *next, int columns)
{
    struct node *tnode;
    tnode = (struct node*)malloc(sizeof(*tnode));
    if(tnode != NULL) {
        tnode->val = malloc(sizeof(int) * columns);
        memcpy(tnode->val, val, sizeof(int) * columns);
        tnode->val = val;
        tnode->next = next;
    };
    return tnode;
}

struct node *mergesort(struct node *head, int column)
{
    struct node *head_one;
    struct node *head_two;
    if((head == NULL) || (head->next == NULL))
        return head;
    head_one = head;
    head_two = head->next;
    while((head_two != NULL) && (head_two->next != NULL)) {
        head = head->next;
        head_two = head->next->next;
    };
    head_two = head->next;
    head->next = NULL;
    return merge(mergesort(head_one, column), mergesort(head_two, column), column);
}

struct node *merge(struct node *head_one, struct node *head_two, int column)
{
    struct node *head_combined;
    if(head_one == NULL)
        return head_two;
    if(head_two == NULL)
        return head_one;
    if(head_one->val[column] < head_two->val[column]) {
        head_combined = head_one;
        head_combined->next = merge(head_one->next, head_two, column);
    } else {
        head_combined = head_two;
        head_combined->next = merge(head_one, head_two->next, column);
    };
    return head_combined;
}

I run it in Unix like this:

name_of_program < test.txt

with test.txt having this structure http://pastebin.com/WL5brutf

share|improve this question
    
where does head come from ? –  wildplasser Jun 5 '13 at 13:52
    
@wildplasser struct node *head; if that's what you ask for. –  user2447592 Jun 5 '13 at 14:25
    
In the new fragment rows and columns are undefined in main(). ALSO int main(int column_to_sort) is a strange way to use argc ... –  wildplasser Jun 5 '13 at 14:57
    
It would help if you included a complete program that compiles without errors. –  sigjuice Jun 5 '13 at 15:00
1  
int main(int column_to_sort) is completely wrong. What do you get if you put printf("column_to_sort %d\n", column_to_sort) at the beginning of main()? Also, omitting parts of your program makes it hard for other people to provide useful advice. –  sigjuice Jun 5 '13 at 15:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

1) You are passing int *val to the function, is using that itself in the node. If you want to discard val passed to the function and want to keep another copy of it, you need to malloc the memory. As you said you know how many elements are in the array, so you can allocate for that many and just copy the memory from val as

 tnode->val = malloc(sizeof(int) * num_of_elements); //replace num_of_elements with appropriate variable/constant
    memcpy(tnode->val, val, sizeof(int) * num_of_elements);

2) Yes, that is correct place.

3) Yes, you can assign values that way for current node pointed by head. You may want to move to next node after j for-loop ends and assign new values in its val.

share|improve this answer
    
I corrected the code, but then after sorting it I get only the array of the last element of the unsorted list. –  user2447592 Jun 5 '13 at 14:51

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