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How is it possible to call a overwritten parent function recursively from a child instance? Since I'm not using static methods I can't use parent::method() but have to do somehow different. I have a feeling that there is a better approach to my problem, maybe through a design pattern. This is my class structure:

class Creature {
    public function eat() {
        // feed and digest
    }
}

class Mammal extends Creature {
    public function eat() {
        // gather and chew
    }
}

class Human extends Mammal {
    public function eat() {
        // have a meal
    }
}

class WesternPerson extends Human {
    public function eat() {
        // use knife & fork
    }
}

$me = new WesternPerson();
$me->eat();

Calling eat() shall go recursively upwards from the special to the very abstract class. Most simple way would be if I could call the parent function with the same name from within the overwritten one. But I know, it's overwritten, so I can't.

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marked as duplicate by bwoebi, Stony, Robert, Lex, Sindre Sorhus Jun 6 '13 at 10:27

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
parent::method() isn't a static call (although it kinda looks like it). Just use that one & you're fine. –  Wrikken Jun 5 '13 at 14:01
1  
See also: stackoverflow.com/a/16925581/2153758 –  bwoebi Jun 5 '13 at 14:04
    
Thanks alot! I obviously was confused because of the :: operator. I's clear now. –  quape Jun 5 '13 at 14:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The :: isn't just for static methods. It is the scope resolution operator. It is used any time you want to utilized a function that exists in scope other then your contextual scope.

parent, static, and self are language constructs that reference different different scopes that relate to your calling scope.

So in this case

 parent::eat()

will call the Human::eat in the WesternPerson::eat context (ie $this will mean the WesternPerson Instance in the Human::eat context)

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As stated in comments, calling parent::eat() would work just fine

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