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So I have my Django app running and I just added South. I performed some migrations which worked fine locally, but I am seeing some database errors on my Heroku version. I'd like to view the current schema for my database both locally and on Heroku so I can compare and see exactly what is different. Is there an easy way to do this from the command line, or a better way to debug this?

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I'm not knowledgeable about Heroku, but if you can shell into it Postgre has a command line tool called psql that will let you view the schema. postgresql.org/docs/9.2/static/app-psql.html – GoatWalker Jun 5 '13 at 14:18
up vote 2 down vote accepted

From the command line you should be able to do heroku pg:psql to connect directly via PSQL to your database and from in there \dt will show you your tables and \d <tablename> will show you your table schema.

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locally django provides a management command that will launch you into your db's shell.

python manage.py dbshell

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Thanks - I tried this, but I don't see any commands for viewing the schema. – user1697845 Jun 5 '13 at 14:26
    
@user1697845 that can be done once your inside of postgres shell, i haven't used postgress in a while but i think it is \dt? use the \h command for help – dm03514 Jun 5 '13 at 14:43

django also provides a management command that will display the sql for any app you have configure in your project, regardless of the database manager (SQLite, MySQL, etc) that you're using:

python manage.py sqlall <app name>

Try it! It could be usefull!

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