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I have a matrix (named points in this example) with large number of rows(<90,000) and only two columns.

A B
1 10.1
2 9.2
3 4.5
1 8.9
1 0.7

I want to create another matrix with only unique values from column "A" and mean of the values from column "B" that correspond to those duplicate value(s).Result:-

A B
1 6.56
2 9.20
3 4.50

Currently, I am using this (below code) which takes a lot of time. So, I would be very thankful if someone can advise me how to speed up these calculations.

uniquedata<-points[which(!duplicated(points[,"A"])),]
reps<-points[which(duplicated(points[,"A"])),]
result<-list()
intensity<-list()
            for(i in c(1:length(uniquedata[,"A"]))){
                result[[i]]<-which(uniquedata[i,"A"]==reps[,"A"])
            }
            for(j in c(1:length(result))){
                if(length(result[[j]])!=0){
                    intensity[j]<-mean(c(reps[result[[j]],"B"],uniquedata[j,"B"]))
                }else{
                    intensity[j]<-uniquedata[j,"B"]
                }
            }
            points1<-cbind(uniquedata[,1],unlist(intensity))

My understanding is that I am doing lots of indexing that's why it is slow. Thanks in advance for the help!

share|improve this question
1  
If you are tempted to use for loops like this in R, you should always take a step back and ask yourself, if this might be a common task. Then you only need to think about search terms. – Roland Jun 5 '13 at 14:38
1  
Indeed, I will in future.Thanks for the advice! – jsin Jun 5 '13 at 14:46
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Obligatory data.table answer:

set.seed(42)
m <- cbind(a=sample(1:3,1e4,TRUE),b=rnorm(1e4))

library(data.table)
DT <- as.data.table(m)
DT[,mean(b),by=a]

#    a          V1
# 1: 3 -0.01237034
# 2: 1  0.01064392
# 3: 2 -0.02411601
share|improve this answer

Given you have a matrix, there is real need to convert to a data.frame. Here is an approach using rowsum

# assuming your matrix  is called M

 rowsum(M[,2],M[,1]) / rowsum(rep_len(1,nrow(M)), M[,1])

Some proper benchmarking

using.by <- function() x <- by(df1$val, df1$name, mean) 
using.aggregate <- function() x <- aggregate(val ~ name, FUN = mean, data = df1)
using.ddply <- function() x <- ddply(df1, .(name), summarize, mu=mean(val))
using.tapply <- function() tapply(df1$val,df1$name,mean)
using.rowsum <- function () x <- rowsum(M[,2],M[,1]) / rowsum(rep_len(1,nrow(M)), M[,1])
using.data.table <- function() x <- DT[,mean(val),by=name]

library(microbenchmark)

set.seed(1)
n <- 1e6
df1 <- data.frame(name=sample(1:5, n, replace = TRUE),
                  val = runif(n))
M <- as.matrix(df1)
DT <- as.data.table(df1)

microbenchmark(using.by(), using.aggregate(), using.ddply(), 
               using.tapply(), using.rowsum(), using.data.table(), 
               times = 10)

Unit: milliseconds
#        expr               min         lq     median         uq        max neval
# using.by()          843.46550  854.22116  862.15995  868.75859  912.49406    10
# using.aggregate()  2416.37227 2451.60134 2482.25319 2498.54546 2501.58574    10
# using.ddply()       208.03686  209.29981  219.74203  253.46119  258.40935    10
# using.tapply()      819.30594  820.77757  830.07718  869.50280  987.24822    10
# using.rowsum()      192.36873  193.48971  194.42591  198.63762  238.91224    10
# using.data.table()   51.46841   52.37541   52.62934   53.05449   54.06227    10

Unsurprisingly data.table is the clear winner!

share|improve this answer

If I understood your question, you're trying to aggregate your data by first column and calculate the mean of the values in second column. You can use a number of functions in R (aggregate, by, tapply). Below is the an example using aggregate.

> my.data <- data.frame(name = sample(1:5, 1000, replace = TRUE), vals = runif(1000))
> head(my.data)
  name       vals
1    3 0.12357187
2    2 0.50271246
3    5 0.03868217
4    5 0.48045079
5    5 0.35684145
6    5 0.36128855
> aggregate(vals ~ name, FUN = mean, data = my.data)
  name      vals
1    1 0.4657559
2    2 0.4920722
3    3 0.5062826
4    4 0.5169585
5    5 0.4857688
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - what I would do. In the OPs specific case: aggregate( B ~ A , points , mean ) (possibly with na.rm = TRUE depending on data) – Simon O'Hanlon Jun 5 '13 at 14:36
    
+1 Thanks alot. Just reliased how silly my code was. – jsin Jun 5 '13 at 14:41

This is a perennial. This is closely related and has more benchmarking and some more advanced methods like key-setting. For completeness, here are some other approaches:

Make reproducible:

set.seed(1)
df1 <- data.frame(name=sample(1:5, 1000, replace = TRUE),
                       val = runif(1000))
head(df1)

gives:

  name        val
1    2 0.53080879
2    2 0.68486090
3    3 0.38328339
4    5 0.95498800
5    2 0.11835658
6    5 0.03910006

tapply can be thought of as making a cross-classification table then applying a function to it as in:

tapply(df1$val,df1$name,mean)

gives:

        1         2         3         4         5 
0.4946062 0.4822890 0.5110930 0.5030683 0.4604779 

plyr is useful for more complex variants of 'split/apply/combine':

library(plyr)
ddply(df1, .(name), summarize, mu=mean(val))

gives:

  name        mu
1    1 0.4946062
2    2 0.4822890
3    3 0.5110930
4    4 0.5030683
5    5 0.4604779

Also there's

by(df1, df1$name, mean)

which gives this (rather unwieldly) output:

df1$name: 1
     name       val 
1.0000000 0.4946062 
------------------------------------------------------------ 
df1$name: 2
    name      val 
2.000000 0.482289 
------------------------------------------------------------ 
df1$name: 3
    name      val 
3.000000 0.511093 
------------------------------------------------------------ 
df1$name: 4
     name       val 
4.0000000 0.5030683 
------------------------------------------------------------ 
df1$name: 5
     name       val 
5.0000000 0.4604779 

EDIT: benchmarking removed

share|improve this answer
1  
Your benchmarking appears to be incorrect. – mnel Jun 6 '13 at 0:06
    
Thanks, I thought so too, but I tried repeating it a few times and results appear consistent. Not sure where I'm going wrong here... I'll edit to remove shortly. – dardisco Jun 6 '13 at 0:47

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