Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
const static char *g_szTestDataFiles[] = {
    ".\\TestData\\file1.txt",
    ".\\TestData\\file2.txt",
    ".\\TestData\\file3.txt",
    ".\\TestData\\file4.txt",
    ".\\TestData\\file5.txt",
    ".\\TestData\\file6.txt"	
};

Is there way to programmatically determine how many items is in that thing? I could always do #define NUM_DATA_FILES 6 or const int NUM_DATA_FILES=6 but is there a better way? I don't think there is, but this seems too basic and I want to make sure i'm not forgetting something . . .

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Arkaitz has given you the preferred way of handling this, but as we're talking about an array of const char * here, you should be able to do the following:

int size = sizeof(g_szTestDataFiles) / sizeof(g_szTestDataFiles[0]);
share|improve this answer
    
Great man thanks!! I was pretty sure there was a way to do that I just couldn't remember it lol. Thanks!! –  cchampion Nov 7 '09 at 20:45
const static char *g_szTestDataFiles[] = {
".\\TestData\\file1.txt",
".\\TestData\\file2.txt",
".\\TestData\\file3.txt",
".\\TestData\\file4.txt",
".\\TestData\\file5.txt",
".\\TestData\\file6.txt",
NULL

};

Now iterate one string after each other till you find NULL.

EDIT: Glen is right though, you should use a std::vector here rather than c style *[]

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for being technically correct. Though as this is tagged C++ is it worth point out that the OP should be using idiomatic C++, i.e. std::vector instead of arrays –  Glen Nov 7 '09 at 20:46

You can use:

sizeof(g_szTestDataFiles) / sizeof(g_szTestDataFiles[0])

Note that this method only works if g_szTestDataFiles is an array and not a pointer.

share|improve this answer

If you are indeed using C++, you might want to use a const vector<string> which gives you some nice abstraction and methods.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah good idea. –  cchampion Nov 7 '09 at 20:49
    
It's a good idea, but in the current version of C++, you can't declare a const std::vector<string>() at global scope and populate it accordingly, unless you want the vector to be empty or consist of multiple copies of one string. C++0x fixes this and allows vector literals. –  Adam Rosenfield Nov 7 '09 at 22:13

You can use this function:

template <typename T, std::size_t N>
inline std::size_t array_size(T (&)[N]) { return N; }

like here:

std::size_t sz = array_size(g_szTestDataFiles);

Anyway, you should follow lhahne advice and use std::vector.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.