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I have not worked with Entity Framework or generics before and am having some difficulty reducing my code.

I am parsing a text file to load 10 lookup tables with data that could possibly change nightly. The text files have a heading for the "type" followed by a list of key/value sets. I have this working perfectly, but I would like to refactor the code to clean it up and would like to use generic methods to accomplish this so I can reduce the duplicated code.

I have gotten the parsing down to a generic method, but I have not been able to figure out how to get the entities added to the context in a generic way. I have to loop over a list of the entities for each type and add them to the context:

void Main()
{
    switch (line.ToUpper())
    {
        case "AREA":
        {
            List<Area> areaList = this.GetItems<Area>(file);

            foreach (var element in areaList)
            {
                if (context.Area.Find(element.Id) == null)
                {
                    context.Area.Add(element);
                }
            }

            break;
        }
        case "CATEGORY":
        {
            List<Category> categoryList = this.GetItems<Category>(file);

            foreach (var element in categoryList)
            {
                if (context.Category.Find(element.Id) == null)
                {
                    context.Category.Add(element);
                }
            }

            break;
        }
    }
}

private List<T> GetItems<T>(StreamReader reader) where T : ILookupData, new()
{
    string line;
    List<T> list = new List<T>();            

    while (reader.Peek() == ' ')
    {
        line = reader.ReadLine().TrimStart();
        string[] tokens = line.Split(new string[] { " - " }, 2, StringSplitOptions.None);

        T item = new T();
        item.Id = Convert.ToInt32(tokens[0]);
        item.Description = (string)tokens[1];

        list.Add(item);
    }

    return list;
}

Update: The above works fine, but cannot seem to get the context added.

I have tried a few different things, but seem to keep getting this error when I try to generic up the context:

The type 'T' must be a reference type in order to use it as parameter 'T' in the generic type of method.

The last thing I tried was to add a generic GetDbSet to the context:

public DbSet<T> GetDbSet<T>() where T : class
{
    return this.Set<T>();
}

But I get the same error in my controller adding this code to the GetItems method:

using (MyContext context = new MyContext())
{
    var dbSet = context.GetDbSet<T>();
}
share|improve this question
    
Try to add "where T:class" constraint to your GetItems method –  jure Jun 5 '13 at 16:01
    
That does not help with adding the .Add<T> functionality. The GetItems currently works, but I am not able to use the context such as context.Set<T>().Add<T>(item); –  Warheft Jun 5 '13 at 16:18
    
You need same constraint on both methods. If Add<T> has "class" constraint than the GetItems method that calls Add, should also have "class" constraint. –  jure Jun 5 '13 at 16:25
    
I did add the constraint to both and still get the reference type error. Should I perhaps be passing in a type different then the entity class? –  Warheft Jun 5 '13 at 16:38
    
Problem solved by changing from ILookupData class constraint to a concrete class inherited by each lookup entity model. Thank you. –  Warheft Jun 5 '13 at 17:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 12 down vote accepted

I have a generic repository in my current project. This is its add method:

public void Add<T>(T newItem) where T : class
{
    db.Set<T>().Add(newItem);
}

where db is the DbContext object itself. The where T : class fixes that error about reference types. Without it, you could pass any type in as T, including bool or struct, or any value type, which DbSet.Add() can't handle. The where specifies that T must be a class, which is a reference type, and therefore allowed.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice and clean answer –  Naresh Goradara Jun 5 '13 at 16:13
    
That works for the repository, but I am still getting the error if I try to call it in GetItems like this: context.Set<T>().Add<T>(item); or context.Add<T>(item); –  Warheft Jun 5 '13 at 16:21
    
Figured it out. It was an inheritance issue with using an interface instead of a concrete type. Now, I just need to modify my models a bit. Thank you. –  Warheft Jun 5 '13 at 16:57
    
Inheriting your objects from a base type is often a good idea; you can add things like an ID field that they all use as primary keys, or DateTime fields to record creation and last edit times. –  anaximander Jun 5 '13 at 17:40

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