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Is it possible to accept two different types of lambda function as class members without knowing their template arguments ahead of time?

struct two_functors {
    std::function<???> a;
    std::function<???> b;
    ...
};

Such that something like this would be possible:

void main(){
    vector<two_functors> many_functors;

    int a = 2;
    int b = 3;
    double c = 4.7;
    double d = 8.4;

    two_functors add_and_subtract;
    add_and_subtract.a = [a, b](int x, int y){cout << x + y << endl;};
    add_and_subtract.b = [c, d](double x, double y){cout << x - y << endl;};

    two_functors multiply_and_divide;
    multiply_and_divide.a = [c, d](double x, double y){cout << x * y << endl;};
    multiply_and_divide.b = [a, b](int x, int y){cout << x / y << endl;};

    many_functors.push_back(add_and_subtract);
    many_functors.push_back(multiply_and_divide);

    for (auto functors : many_functors){
        functors.a();
        functors.b();
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
Could be done using templates, I expect... –  Mats Petersson Jun 5 '13 at 16:45
    
Can two_functors be a class template? Aren't add_and_print.a() and add_and_print.b() incorrect without some arguments to pass as x, y, and s? –  aschepler Jun 5 '13 at 16:45
    
The only reason to need to declare something ahead is if something else uses it. So you expect some statement to use add_and_print without having any kind of clue what it contains? Do you have an example of what you're trying to do? –  aschepler Jun 5 '13 at 16:59
    
Nesting is probably irrelevant. You can have a class template nested inside a non-template class. –  aschepler Jun 5 '13 at 17:01
2  
There is no possible way to make a container of functors with differing argument types useful without a whole lot of wrapping and argument-checking code. –  aschepler Jun 5 '13 at 17:35
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you just want to construct two_functors at various times, but execute them later in sequence all at once, you could just use the captured data.

struct two_functors
{
    function<void ()> a;
    function<void ()> b;
};

int main()
{
    vector<two_functors> many_functors;

    int a = 2;
    int b = 3;
    double c = 4.7;
    double d = 8.4;

    two_functors add_and_subtract {
        [a, b](){cout << a + b << endl;},
        [c, d](){cout << c - d << endl;}
    };

    two_functors multiply_and_divide {
        [c, d](){cout << c * d << endl;},
        [a, b](){cout << a / b << endl;}
    };

    many_functors.push_back(add_and_subtract);
    many_functors.push_back(multiply_and_divide);

    for (auto functors : many_functors){
        functors.a();
        functors.b();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is actually just what I needed! Thanks, it seems my initial understanding of lambdas was flawed. –  Eric B Jun 5 '13 at 18:19
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That's essentially a tuple. You can see how the interface is implemented for that.

template< class F0, class F1 >
struct two_functors {
   F0 func0;
   F1 func1;
};

template< class F0, class F1 >
two_functors<F0, F1> make_two_functor( F0&& f0, F1&& f1 )
{ 
   // Added [std::forward][2]
   return two_functors<F0,F1>( std::forward<F0>(f0), std::forward<F1>(f1) ); 
}
share|improve this answer
    
auto f1 = []{}; auto result = make_two_functor( f1, f1 ); uses struct members with reference type. I don't think that's what you want. –  aschepler Jun 5 '13 at 18:30
    
Good point. Then how does make_tuple deal with that ? –  Steven Maitlall Jun 5 '13 at 18:39
    
std::make_tuple uses std::decay<Ti>::type as the parameters for the returned tuple. (Ignoring extra logic for std::ref and std::cref.) –  aschepler Jun 5 '13 at 18:45
    
Gotcha ... thanks –  Steven Maitlall Jun 5 '13 at 18:51
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Not an attempt to answer (I just need the formatting feat), just a variation of Steven's proposal

template<typename A, typename B> 
two_functors<A,B> make_two_functors(A&& a, B&& b) {
   return two_functors<A,B> {a, b};
}

Does that have any downside compared to using std::forward<T>?

Btw - I somehow wish the need for such "makers" would have vanished with C++11.

share|improve this answer
    
without std::forward, it can't accept r-value references properly, and the default move constructor for the struct won't be invoked. –  Tim Seguine Oct 18 '13 at 16:56
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An alternative to Steven's answer would be to use an intermediate "umbrella" class.

EDIT: Just compiled an example on g++ (GCC) 4.5.3

 #include <functional>
 #include <iostream>

 using namespace std;

 class myfunction
 {

 };

 template <typename T>
 class specificFunction : public myfunction
 {
     public:
     function<T> f;

     specificFunction(function<T> pf)
     {
         f = pf;
     }
 };

 struct two_functors {
     myfunction* a;
     myfunction* b;
 };



int main()
{
     myfunction* f = new specificFunction<void(int,int)> ([](int a, int b) { cout << a << " - " << b << endl; });
     myfunction* f2 = new specificFunction<void(double,int)> ([](double a, int b) { cout << a << " - " << b << endl; });

     two_functors tf;
     tf.a = f;
     tf.b = f2;

     ((specificFunction<void(int,int)>*)(tf.a))->f(4,5);
     ((specificFunction<void(double,int)>*)(tf.b))->f(4.02,5);

 }
share|improve this answer
    
Of course, there's no practical way to do anything useful with a myfunction*. –  aschepler Jun 5 '13 at 17:06
    
@aschepler What do you mean? if instead of a struct you put your functions in a container, this is one way to solve it. Can you explain further your comment? –  Pedrom Jun 5 '13 at 17:08
    
Sure, you can do add_and_print.a = make_specificFunction( [a,b](int x, int y) { return x+y; } );. But then you can't do (*add_and_print.a)(4,5);, because myfunction has no operator(). –  aschepler Jun 5 '13 at 17:21
    
@aschepler Sure you can, you only need to cast it with the proper signature... Something like ((SpecificConnector<void(int,int)>*)(*add_and_print.a)).f(4,5); –  Pedrom Jun 5 '13 at 17:24
    
That stuff between < and > is not valid as a template argument. –  aschepler Jun 5 '13 at 17:28
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