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I have a query that looks similar to the one below (albeit more complicated). When running it I get the following error: ORA-22818: Subquery expressions not allowed here in my group by statement.

What is the best way for me to get around this issue?

SELECT table1.ID   
       NVL(fget_office(fget_last_catc_id_by_date((SELECT MAX(table3.date) FROM table3 INNER JOIN table1 ON table1.ID = table3.id),table1.NUM), fget_max_split_line_no('FILL',(SELECT MAX table3.tc_id) FROM table3 INNER JOIN table1 ON table1.ID = table3.ID INNER JOIN table4 ON table3.tc_id = table3.tc_id))), table1.distribution) "OFFICE", --eper.DISTRIBUTION "OFFICE",
       table1.name 
  FROM table1
  LEFT JOIN table2
    ON table1.ID = table2.ID 
 WHERE table1.company in ('CP01', 'CP02')
 GROUP BY table1.ID,
          NVL(fget_office(fget_last_catc_id_by_date((SELECT MAX(table3.date) FROM table3 INNER JOIN table1 ON table1.ID = table3.id),table1.NUM), fget_max_split_line_no('FILL',(SELECT MAX table3.tc_id) FROM table3 INNER JOIN table1 ON table1.ID = table3.ID INNER JOIN table4 ON table3.tc_id = table3.tc_id))), table1.distribution),          
          table1.name
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code sample looks like you're using GROUP BY just to pull distinct rows. In that case, try this:

SELECT DISTINCT
       table1.ID   
       NVL(fget_office(fget_last_catc_id_by_date((SELECT MAX(table3.date) FROM table3 INNER JOIN table1 ON table1.ID = table3.id),table1.NUM), fget_max_split_line_no('FILL',(SELECT MAX table3.tc_id) FROM table3 INNER JOIN table1 ON table1.ID = table3.ID INNER JOIN table4 ON table3.tc_id = table3.tc_id))), table1.distribution) "OFFICE", --eper.DISTRIBUTION "OFFICE",
       table1.name 
  FROM table1
  LEFT JOIN table2
    ON table1.ID = table2.ID 
 WHERE table1.company in ('CP01', 'CP02')

In case you really are doing aggregation in your "real" query, a quick workaround would be to use a Common Table Expression (CTE), which is supported in Oracle 9i. This example assumes you're summing a column named some_value:

WITH x AS (
  SELECT table1.ID   
         NVL(fget_office(fget_last_catc_id_by_date((SELECT MAX(table3.date) FROM table3 INNER JOIN table1 ON table1.ID = table3.id),table1.NUM), fget_max_split_line_no('FILL',(SELECT MAX table3.tc_id) FROM table3 INNER JOIN table1 ON table1.ID = table3.ID INNER JOIN table4 ON table3.tc_id = table3.tc_id))), table1.distribution) "OFFICE", --eper.DISTRIBUTION "OFFICE",
         table1.name,
         some_value
    FROM table1
    LEFT JOIN table2
      ON table1.ID = table2.ID 
   WHERE table1.company in ('CP01', 'CP02')
)
SELECT ID, OFFICE, name, SUM(some_value)
FROM x
GROUP BY ID, Office, name
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It looks to me like the results of those functions are directly or indirectly determined by the values of table1.

If so, you can perform the distinct operation on a simple set of data from table1 and table2 and apply the functions afterwards. This would reduce the number of calls to the functions and improve efficiency.

with cte1 as (
  select
    table1.id   
    table1.num
    table1.distribution,
    table1.name 
  from
    table1 left join table2 on (table1.id = table2.id)
 where
   table1.company in ('CP01', 'CP02'))
select
  cte1.id,
  coalesce(
    fget_office(
      fget_last_catc_id_by_date(
        (select max(table3.date)
         from   table3 inner join cte1 on cte1.id = table3.id),
        cte1.num),
      fget_max_split_line_no(
        'FILL',
        (select max(table3.tc_id)
         from   table3 inner join cte1   on cte1.id      = table3.id
                       inner join table4 on table3.tc_id = table3.tc_id))),
    table1.distribution) office
  cte1.name 
from cte1
/

You might as well get used to using Coalesce() instead of Nvl() -- it's ANSI compliant, more flexible, and features short-circuit evaluation so it's handy of your codebase has a lot of PL/SQL functions that get called in SQL.

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