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I'm learning NASM at the moment and am making a simple program that does multiplication of any user-input variables through shifting and addition.

I've been running into a series of issues: My multiplicand is, for some reason, being given at the maximum data value a word can hold. Furthermore, my answer, if the program should get that far, is almost always wrong (even though I believe my algorithm is correct!).

extern printf
extern scanf

section .data
    message: db "Enter your multiplicand: "
    message_L: equ $-message
    message2: db "The number you entered is: %d ", 10, 0
    message2_L: equ $-message2
    message3: db "Enter your multiplier: "
    message3_L: equ $-message3
    message4: db "Your multiplier is: %d ", 10, 0
    message4_L: equ $-message4
    message5: db "The product of this multiplication is: %d ", 10, 0
    mesasge5_L: equ $-message5
    fmt1: db "%d", 0

section .bss
    multiplicand: resw 1
    multiplier: resw 1
    product: resw 1

section .text
    global main
scanInt:
    push ebp
    mov ebp, esp
    sub esp, 2
    lea eax, [ebp-2]
    push eax
    push dword fmt1
    call scanf
    mov ax, word[ebp-2]
    mov esp, ebp
    pop ebp
    ret

main:
    xor eax, eax
    xor ebx, ebx
    xor ecx, ecx
    xor edx, edx

    mov eax, 4
    mov ebx, 1
    mov ecx, message
    mov edx, message_L
    int 80h

        call scanInt
        mov word[multiplicand], ax
    mov word[product], ax

    jmp print1
main2:
    mov eax, 4
    mov ebx, 1
    mov ecx, message3
    mov edx, message3_L
    int 80h

    call scanInt
    mov word[multiplier], ax

    jmp print2
main3:
    mov ax, word[multiplicand]
    jmp check
check:
    cmp word[multiplier], 2
    jz printAnswer
    ror [multiplier], 1
    shl word[multiplier], 1
    jc carry
    shr word[multiplier], 1
    shr word[multiplier], 1
    shl word[product], 1
    jmp check

carry:
    add word[product], ax
    shr word[multiplier], 1
    clc
    jmp check

endLoop:
    mov eax, 1
    mov ebx, 0
    int 80h

printAnswer:
    push ebp
    mov ebp, esp
    push word[product]
    push dword message5
    call printf
    add esp, 12
    mov esp, ebp
    pop ebp
    jmp endLoop

print1:
    push ebp
    mov ebp, esp
    push dword[multiplicand]
    push dword message2
    call printf
    add esp, 12
    mov esp, ebp
    pop ebp
    jmp main2

print2:
    push ebp
    mov ebp, esp
    push dword[multiplier]
    push dword message4
    call printf
    add esp, 12
    mov esp, ebp
    pop ebp
    jmp main3
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2  
Why not just put the code here? My company firewall won't let me get to pastebin. >8v( –  Fred Larson Jun 5 '13 at 17:49
2  
Does it ever work right? What does it specifically do wrong? –  wallyk Jun 5 '13 at 17:52
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1 Answer

I think your main problem comes from using word variables. Making a two-byte buffer on the stack, and calling scanf to read into it is almost certainly a problem. Pushing a word in 32-bit code is "legal", but likely to cause problems. In one instance, you call printf with two variables, and add esp, 12 afterwards. Make 'em all dwords and keep your stack manipulation in four-byte chunks. I think that'll cure most of your problems.

The man pages explicitly suggest not mixing high-level, buffered I/O, functions with low level functions (printf, scanf, fopen(), fread(), fwrite(), etc. are high level functions, open(), read(), write()... and system calls are low level functions). I don't think that this is causing any of your problems, but it can cause weird results. For example, printf doesn't print anything until the buffer is flushed. Ending with a linefeed, or using another high level I/O function will flush the buffer. sys_read, for example, does not. I'd stick to one or the other.

Good luck!

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