Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
img {
    max-width: 100% !important; /* Set a maxium relative to the parent */
    width: auto\9 !important; /* IE7-8 need help adjusting responsive images */
    height: auto; /* Scale the height according to the width, otherwise you get stretching */
    vertical-align: middle;
    border: 0;
    display: block;
    -ms-interpolation-mode: bicubic;
}

The above CSS is taken from Twitter Bootstrap which allows for responsive images. The only problem is this has no effect in Firefox and IE.

In the following case:

<div class="row-fluid">
    <div id="logo" class="span4">
        <a href="<?= home_url( '/' ) ?>"><img src="<?= get_template_directory_uri() ?>/assets/images/logo.png" /></a>
    </div>
</div>

http://dev.netcoding.net/lowsglass/about-us/ - Here is a page showing the problem.

In Firefox or IE, shrink the page to below 432px and you will see that the images do not follow max-width anymore (while above 764px they do).

How can I fix this – without using image containers – to make responsive images work in Firefox and IE?

share|improve this question
    
Sounds like Bootstrap's Responsive bits might be causing you some issues. Are you certain no media queries are interfering? –  Jason M. Batchelor Jun 5 '13 at 17:54
    
I am positive it's not the media queries. The img tag doesn't have any styles applied except from responsive.css and @media print. –  Brian Graham Jun 5 '13 at 18:00

5 Answers 5

I've struggled a lot with Firefox / IE and max-width, specifically when on elements of display: inline-block. I use the CSS only solution below to add my fixes.

// Styles for Firefox
@-moz-document url-prefix() {
    #logo img {
        width: 100%;
    }
}

// Styles for IE10
@media screen and (-ms-high-contrast: active), (-ms-high-contrast: none) {
    #logo img {
        width: 100%;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
In my head, I am serenading you with Bette Midler. –  Shelly Nov 24 '14 at 17:23

Instead of width:auto, try width:100%.

Best,

Cynthia

share|improve this answer
    
This won't work on Firefox unless the parent has a fixed width defined. –  Onimusha Nov 7 '13 at 7:57

Actually, the problem isn't the img tag being affected, but the span* containers. When Bootstrap Responsive gets to a certain point, it turns off floating, and sets width to 100%. When that container pops back to 100%, the child within (your img tag) does exactly what you told it to do, which is expand to max-width of 100%.

Look at this from responsive.css... above the declaration in the stylesheet, you'll see this:

/* Landscape phone to portrait tablet */
@media (max-width: 767px) {

[class*="span"], .uneditable-input[class*="span"], .row-fluid [class*="span"] {
    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    display: block;
    float: none;
    margin-left: 0;
    width: 100%;
}

That is what is causing the img to "resize" ... its container no longer shrinks past a certain point, due to the way Bootstrap's responsive styles are set up.

To block this, you could either modify the Bootstrap stylesheet (in which case you will have to redo the change anytime you want to update your Bootstrap files), or you can, in your own stylesheet, do something like the following:

/* Landscape phone to portrait tablet */
@media (max-width: 767px) {

[class*="span"], .uneditable-input[class*="span"], .row-fluid [class*="span"] {
    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    display: inline-block;
    float: left;
}

That will put the floating back, however, you're still left with width as an issue, as the default Bootstrap style at that screen-width is trying to set width to 100%. You could try setting width:auto and then hopefully the widths for each specific span-step (.span1, .span2, etc.) will be allowed to take over, but you'll really have to test it out to see what is going to work best for your situation.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you have a solution?... –  Brian Graham Jun 7 '13 at 15:35
    
My apologies... it's been a busy week! Unfortunately, I can't really give you anything specific, as it will really depend on your target screen sizes and what you really want it to look like at those sizes. You're going to have to tinker with it, honestly, to get a look that works for you and is still usable. –  Jason M. Batchelor Jun 13 '13 at 14:21

Bumped in similar problem after implementing large amount of site design using Bootstrap framework and only Chrome for debug... Biiig mistake © :) It appeared, that cool fluid Bootstrap styles didn't work for images in IE and Mozilla at all. All images were not resized and had original width, sometimes much wider than I've expected to see...

I had a lot of similar places with two columns of divs - span6 for left column and span6 for right one (those are styles for fluid Bootstrap grid). Sometimes in those columns images were placed between text lines, and as you see, images didn't resize well in IE\Mozilla and all of the cool design became not good at all :(

After googling and trying some advices from github I've decided to use jQuery :) I added class to column container (imageContainer for fluid span12 row), and added classes 50perc for images which I needed to resize properly (size of each image should be 50% of container's size). And here's the code:

$(function(){
    var cont = $('.imageContainer');
    $('.50perc').each(function(i, el){
    $(el).width(cont.width() / 2);
});

p.s. Actually it will be much effective to use this function in window.resize event handler :)

share|improve this answer

Ran into the same problem and still haven't found a fix or CSS only hack, except for forcing width: 100% at small browser sizes, when the natural width of the image will usually be larger than the width of the page (here I've assumed I don't have any images narrower than 480px):

img
{
    width: auto;
    max-width: 100%;
    height: auto;
}

@media screen and (max-width: 480px), only screen and (max-device-width: 480px) and (orientation: portrait)
{

    @-moz-document url-prefix() {
        /* Firefox doesn't respect max-width in certain situations */
        img
        {
            width: 100%;
        }
    }

But that will still force images that have naturally smaller widths to get blown up, which is bad. So at that point, if Javascript is feasible or already in use, I would add this to hit every image:

PSEUDO CODE:

$('img').css('max-width', this.actualFullSizeWidth + 'px');

...which should override the CSS max-width rules, and guarantee the image doesn't get larger than it's actual width.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.