Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am seeing some unexpected behavior in Jquery. It appears jquery is converting " to literal double quotes, which is messing with form validation in a single page app I am working on. The content is set via jquery at which point the the form fields containing " get converted to " which breaks the form.

As a test, I tried regular JS dom manipulation and got different results. This appears to be consistant amont 1.x and 2.x versions of Jquery.

Here is the code I tried:

// Regular Javascript
var e = document.createElement('div');
var textNode=document.createTextNode('&');
e.appendChild(textNode)
console.log(e.childNodes) //=> ['&']

var e = document.createElement('div');
var textNode=document.createTextNode('"');
e.appendChild(textNode)
console.log(e.childNodes) //=> ['"']

// vs. Jquery

e = $('<div>')
content = '&amp;'
e.html(content)
console.log(e.html()) //=> &amp;

e = $('<div>')
content = '&quot;'
e.html(content)
console.log(e.html()) // => " (a quote)

Any thoughts?

Edit Jquery doc says .html() is based on the browsers innerHTML implementation. However, using the pure JS code from above: console.log(e.innerHTML) yeilds: &amp; and &quot; respectively.

Additionally, calling innerHTML on the actual dom stored in jquery yeilds: console.log(e.get(0).innerHTML) & and " respectively.

e = $('<div />');
content = '&quot;'
e.html(content)
console.log(e.get(0).innerHTML) // => "
console.log(e.html()) // => "
console.log(e.text()) // => "

e = $('<div />');
content = '&amp;'
e.html(content)
console.log(e.get(0).innerHTML) //=> &amp;
console.log(e.html()) //=> &amp;
console.log(e.text()) //=> &
share|improve this question
1  
You shouldn't be using jQuery for this. Vanilla JS is superior in every way. – Niet the Dark Absol Jun 5 '13 at 21:32

The $.html() method will decode / encode HTML entities. To bypass this behavior consider using $.text() instead:

var e = $("<div>"), content = "&quot;";
e.text(content);
console.log(e.text()); // outputs &quot;

EDIT

You may consider just using a regex replace to find the offending quotes and encode them yourself like so:

var e = $("<div>"), content = "&quot;&amp;";
e.html(content);
console.log(e.html()); // outputs "&amp;

var e_encoded = e.html().replace(/"/g, "&quot;");
console.log(e_encoded); // outputs &quot;&amp;

Keep in mind that the above will also encode any quotes used for HTML attributes within any tags contained in the content variable, which is persumably why the $.html() method does not encode them to begin with.

I hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for linking to documentation. – Niet the Dark Absol Jun 5 '13 at 21:32
    
It only appears to do that for double quote though. re: &amp; is left alone. And there is surrounding markup so I am unable to use .text(). This is s distilled down example. – Blaine Garrett Jun 5 '13 at 21:44
1  
@BlaineGarrett take a look at the updated answer. – dSquared Jun 5 '13 at 21:51

Use the .text() method rather than .html().

share|improve this answer
    
It only appears to do that for double quote though. re: &amp; is left alone. – Blaine Garrett Jun 5 '13 at 21:40

Consensus is that this is expected behavior because jquery is just wrapping the browser's innerHTML method.

This is sad news it seems for single page apps that need to differentiate between " and " in rendered form input etc.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.