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I'm implementing the cert authentication in a servlet filter. I obtains the client cert using the httpRequest.getAttribute("javax.servlet.request.X509Certificate") API. When the user starts a browser and accesses the web server for the first time, the underlying SSL requests the client cert and the browser prompts for the cert selection. However, after the user logs out and I've invalidated the HTTP session, if the user does not close the browser and come back to the Web server, the underlying SSL does NOT trigger the browser to prompt for the cert selection again. I assume it's because the SSL session was not torn down after the user logged out from the Web server at HTTP layer. My question is that is there a way to invalidate the underlying SSL session from the servlet? A more general question, how can I get the browser to re-prompt for the cert selection after the user logs out from Web server?

Thanks, Gang

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My question is that is there a way to invalidate the underlying SSL session from the servlet?

You would have to write a Tomcat Valve and probably alter some Tomcat source code as well. I've been several layers deep into the Tomcat HTTPS/authentication source code and I haven't seen a hook that would give you the SSLSession.

A more general question, how can I get the browser to re-prompt for the cert selection after the user logs out from Web server?

Invalidating the SSL session, if you can do it, may or may not have that effect. I would think it would be the browser-specific.

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I've used the same browser (IE9) I used to test my authentication filter to access a remote website that requires client cert for authentication. When I logged out that website and go back in, the browser re-prompts for the cert. So I believe it can be implemented from ther server side. Maybe that website's implementation is at the SSL layer. –  user2457391 Jun 10 '13 at 17:08

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