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Let's say I have an array of strings, e.g. @matches = ("cat", "zebra", "apple"), and I want to open a file and try to match these strings in the simplest way possible.

while (<MYFILE>)
{
    chomp;

    if (..some match condition...)
    {
        ..stuff..
    }
}

I could just use a foreach on each line to try to match, but I know there's got to be a concise way in Perl to say "if string X matches any of the patterns in array Y." I just can't seem to find this anywhere.

EDIT:

To clarify, here's the highly inefficient code:

while (<MYFILE>)
{
    chomp;

    foreach $m (@matches)
    { 
        if (~ /$m/)
        {
            ..stuff..
        }
    }
}

I know there's some shorthand method of doing this.

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2  
What do you mean with “matches”? (a) “is equal to”, (b) “contains as substring”, or (c) “matches when used as regex”? Are you willing to use non-core modules? This makes a fine use-case for the any-junction –  amon Jun 5 '13 at 22:30
    
See edit above. –  CaptSaltyJack Jun 5 '13 at 22:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about using join to make an impromptu regex?

my @matches = ("cat", "zebra", "apple");
my $rx = join "|", @matches;

while (<$fh>) {
    if ($_ =~ /$rx/) {
         # stuff
    }
}
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It's fine but, first, I think it would be more efficient to compile the regex only once, either with qr or adding the o flag. And second, there is to pay attention to the ordering of the words in the alternation, because cat|category could be dangerous. –  Birei Jun 5 '13 at 22:44
    
@Birei You foresee some trouble with strings where cat and category will conflict? –  TLP Jun 5 '13 at 23:10
    
I thought that the OP wanted to know also what matched and not only if it exists a match. No problem, forget it. –  Birei Jun 6 '13 at 7:05
    
@Birei Then you could do my @words = /($rx)/g, and order will not matter. –  TLP Jun 6 '13 at 9:48
1  
@Birei Oh, right. Yes, I suppose that would be the better way. Although the proper way perhaps would be to not allow cat to partially match category, using for example word boundary. –  TLP Jun 6 '13 at 10:10

You seem to want to use the entries of @matches as regexes. Then, you can join them to a larger regex:

my $rx = join '|', @matches;

while (<>) {
  do stuff if $_ =~ $rx;
}

If you want to match the literal contents of the entries of @matches, so that @matches = ("foo+") matches the line foo+ and not fooo as above solution would do, you can construct the regex like

my $rx = join '|', map quotemeta, @matches;
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